VP Joe Biden's impromptu speech on refugees and American values is exactly what I needed to hear.

CBS 11's Jack Fink shouted a question to Vice President Joe Biden.

"Mr. Vice President, can we ask you a question about the Syrian refugees, sir?"


I love the way he turned his head and immediately went toward the question.

It's basically what I do when I smell bacon. To Vice President Biden, truth and kindness are his bacon.

Then, Biden made two great points immediately.

1. Kindness

2. Truth

I love the smell of that!

Go on then, Joe!

And with that, he was done.

How can you deny that? Like, Come ON.

That's the truth right there.

And when our buddy Biden said, "We have a real vetting system for refugees coming into this country," he was. not. kidding.

Right now, we're seeing a whole lotta conversations about how welcoming Syrian refugees to our country could somehow make us less safe. But, I'm taking a tip from Biden, and sticking to the truth.

Here are the facts:

1. Refugees are the most vetted category of folks coming to the United States. They have to undergo interviews and a TON of security screenings from the Department of State, Department of Homeland Security, FBI, Department of Defense, and more before they can come to the U.S.

2. Syrian refugees can't just "show up." It takes an average of 18 to 24 months for refugee applications to be processed in the U.S. And it's actually taking a lot longer right now because the White House is being extra cautious about security concerns after the Paris attacks.

Also, here's one for kindness:

3. Syrian refugees are fleeing some of the worst violence and terror ... not unlike the violence and terror we recently saw in Paris. These folks are survivors. And we should stand with them, especially right now.

I'm with Marine Phil Klay who tweeted:

"[I]t's only during frightening times when you get to find out if your country really deserves to call itself the 'home of the brave.'"

If that just made your heart explode like it did mine, go ahead and share this with someone.

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
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This story was originally shared on Capital One.

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"Baking cakes gave me the confidence to believe in my own brand and now I put my heart into giving my customers something they'll enjoy eating," Klohr said.

While driven to launch her own baking business, pursuing a dream in the culinary arts was economically challenging for Klohr. In the United States, culinary schools can open doors to future careers, but the cost of entry can be upwards of $36,000 a year.

Through a friend, Klohr learned about La Cocina VA, a nonprofit dedicated to providing job training and entrepreneurship development services at a training facility in the Washington, D.C-area.

La Cocina VA's, which translates to "the kitchen" in Spanish, offers its Bilingual Culinary Training program to prepare low-and moderate-income individuals from diverse backgrounds to launch careers in the food industry.

That program gave Klohr the ability to fully immerse herself in the baking industry within a professional kitchen facility and receive training in an array of subjects including culinary skills, food safety, career development and English language classes.

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In the autumn of 1939, Chiune Sugihara was sent to Lithuania to open the first Japanese consulate there. His job was to keep tabs on and gather information about Japan's ally, Germany. Meanwhile, in neighboring Poland, Nazi tanks had already begun to roll in, causing Jewish refugees to flee into the small country.

When the Soviet Union invaded Lithuania in June of 1940, scores of Jews flooded the Japanese consulate, seeking transit visas to be able to escape to a safety through Japan. Overwhelmed by the requests, Sugihara reached out to the foreign ministry in Tokyo for guidance and was told that no one without proper paperwork should be issued a visa—a limitation that would have ruled out nearly all of the refugees seeking his help.

Sugihara faced a life-changing choice. He could obey the government and leave the Jews in Lithuania to their fate, or he could disobey orders and face disgrace and the loss of his job, if not more severe punishments from his superiors.

According to the Jewish Virtual Library, Sugihara was fond of saying, "I may have to disobey my government, but if I don't, I would be disobeying God." Sugihara decided it was worth it to risk his livelihood and good standing with the Japanese government to give the Jews at his doorstep a fighting chance, so he started issuing Japanese transit visas to any refugee who needed one, regardless of their eligibility.

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