These side-by-side photos show exactly how Fox News controls Trump's thoughts.

One of the most alarming aspects of Donald Trump’s presidency is the flippant way he handles his daily intelligence briefings.

His most important job is commander in chief of the world’s most powerful military, but he prefers a pared down oral briefing over the full daily document outlining the most pressing information from hot spots around the globe.

Leon Panetta, a former CIA director and defense secretary for President Barack Obama, highlighted the potential danger caused by Trump’s approach to intelligence.


“Something will be missed,” Panetta told the Washington Post. “If for some reason his instincts on what should be done are not backed up by the intelligence because he hasn’t taken the time to read that intel, it increases the risk that he will make a mistake.”

“You can have the smartest people around you — in the end it still comes down to his decision,” he added.

Instead, it appears as though Trump’s worldview is shaped by the hosts of Fox News.

Matthew Gertz, a senior fellow at Media Matters for America, believes that a recent Trump tweet where he threatened to “end” Iran came nine minutes after a segment that aired on Fox News.

On Sunday afternoon, Trump tweeted: “If Iran wants to fight, that will be the official end of Iran. Never threaten the United States again!”

To bolster his theory that Trump was live-tweeting Fox News, Gertz showed how Trump followed that tweet up with tweets that aligned with a Fox news segments on immigration and Mayor Pete Buttigieg.

“A man with unparalleled access to the world’s most powerful information-gathering machine, with an intelligence budget estimated at $73 billion last year, prefers to rely on conservative cable news hosts to understand current events,” Gertz wrote in Politico.

It's unconscionable that a partisan news network should be given so much power and even more disturbing that Trump considers it a trustworthy source.

This isn’t the first time Gertz has caught Trump live-tweeting Fox News. He has lined up Trump’s tweets with Fox programming countless times on his Twitter feed.

Here are just a few examples:

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.