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The Internet lost it (in a good way) after this Olympian came out as gay.

If you don't know who Gus Kenworthy is, you should.

On Oct. 22, 2015, Gus Kenworthy publicly came out as gay.

The 24-year-old opened up about his sexuality to ESPN, which included his story in its Being Out Issue, on newsstands Oct. 30, 2015.


In case you need reminding, Kenworthy is the American freestyle skier who won a silver medal at the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia...

Photo by Antonin Thuillier/AFP/Getty Images.

...and then became extra famous for rescuing five stray dogs while he was there.

Driving to the beach with @robindmacdonald and @thesochipups!
A photo posted by gus kenworthy (@guskenworthy) on
At long last, I've found them! Today is a happy day :) #puppies #sochistrays #howdoibringthemhome
A photo posted by gus kenworthy (@guskenworthy) on

The pups got a lot of attention upon returning to the U.S., too, as evidenced by their popular (and ridiculously adorable) Instagram account.

After the ESPN story was published online this week, the Internet's crush on Kenworthy got about 10x stronger.

A lot of people had a lot of really supportive things to say about his announcement.

Like, for instance, Miley Cyrus, who mentioned that Kenworthy might lend a helping hand in supporting her advocacy work for homeless LGBTQ youth...

My hero @guskenworthy @happyhippiefdn
A photo posted by Miley Cyrus (@mileycyrus) on

And retired NBA star Jason Collins, who certainly knows what it feels like to come out of the closet with the whole world watching...


And even the official Team USA, which couldn't be prouder to call him their own.


But while support for Kenworthy went viral, it was also tough to hear about the struggles he'd faced before coming out publicly.

Even though Kenworthy began coming out to loving, close friends and supportive family members a couple years ago, coming out to everyone — especially as a champion in the world of action sports — was a much more difficult feat to complete.

Photo by Quinn Rooney/Getty Images.

"I was insecure and ashamed," he told ESPN. "Unless you're gay, being gay has never been looked at as being cool. And I wanted to be cool."

Attracting an onslaught of female attention due to his fame as a skier — something many guys wouldn't, you know, mind having — actually became a source of pain and confusion for him as well.

"I know hooking up with hot girls doesn't sound like the worst thing in the world. But I literally would sleep with a girl and then cry about it afterward. I'm like, 'What am I doing? I don't know what I'm doing.'" — Gus Kenworthy

The Olympian said living in the closet resulted in an ongoing battle with depression and struggles with anxiety. At one point, he was suicidal.

Kenworthy's story serves as a good reminder that although we've come a very long way in LGBTQ acceptance, coming out can still be (and in many cases is) an excruciatingly difficult process — especially in the world of sports.

The good news is that Kenworthy has been "truly blown away" by the amount of love sent his way this week.

Watching his story go public was an understandably emotional experience...

...but reactions from fans (and his mom) have been very appreciated.

Now Kenworthy seems ready to start living his best, most honest life.


He says he hopes his authenticity will be another step forward in making the coming out process a little bit easier — and not-so-newsworthy — for others down the road.

A lot can be learned from the Olympian's story. But Kenworthy said it best by quoting one of the greats.

Leah Menzies/TikTok

Leah Menzies had no idea her deceased mother was her boyfriend's kindergarten teacher.

When you start dating the love of your life, you want to share it with the people closest to you. Sadly, 18-year-old Leah Menzies couldn't do that. Her mother died when she was 7, so she would never have the chance to meet the young woman's boyfriend, Thomas McLeodd. But by a twist of fate, it turns out Thomas had already met Leah's mom when he was just 3 years old. Leah's mom was Thomas' kindergarten teacher.

The couple, who have been dating for seven months, made this realization during a visit to McCleodd's house. When Menzies went to meet his family for the first time, his mom (in true mom fashion) insisted on showing her a picture of him making a goofy face. When they brought out the picture, McLeodd recognized the face of his teacher as that of his girlfriend's mother.

Menzies posted about the realization moment on TikTok. "Me thinking my mum (who died when I was 7) will never meet my future boyfriend," she wrote on the video. The video shows her and McLeodd together, then flashes to the kindergarten class picture.

“He opens this album and then suddenly, he’s like, ‘Oh my God. Oh my God — over and over again,” Menzies told TODAY. “I couldn’t figure out why he was being so dramatic.”

Obviously, Menzies is taking great comfort in knowing that even though her mother is no longer here, they can still maintain a connection. I know how important it was for me to have my mom accept my partner, and there would definitely be something missing if she wasn't here to share in my joy. It's also really incredible to know that Menzies' mother had a hand in making McLeodd the person he is today, even if it was only a small part.

@speccylee

Found out through this photo in his photo album. A moment straight out of a movie 🥲

♬ iris - 🫶

“It’s incredible that that she knew him," Menzies said. "What gets me is that she was standing with my future boyfriend and she had no idea.”

Since he was only 3, McLeodd has no actual memory of Menzies' mother. But his own mother remembers her as “kind and really gentle.”

The TikTok has understandably gone viral and the comments are so sweet and positive.

"No the chills I got omggg."

"This is the cutest thing I have watched."

"It’s as if she remembered some significance about him and sent him to you. Love fate 😍✨"

In the caption of the video, she said that discovering the connection between her boyfriend and her mom was "straight out of a movie." And if you're into romantic comedies, you're definitely nodding along right now.

Menzies and McLeodd made a follow-up TikTok to address everyone's positive response to their initial video and it's just as sweet. The young couple sits together and addresses some of the questions they noticed pop up. People were confused that they kept saying McLeodd was in kindergarten but only 3 years old when he was in Menzies' mother's class. The couple is Australian and Menzies explained that it's the equivalent of American preschool.

They also clarified that although they went to high school together and kind of knew of the other's existence, they didn't really get to know each other until they started dating seven months ago. So no, they truly had no idea that her mother was his teacher. Menzies revealed that she "didn't actually know that my mum taught at kindergarten."

"I just knew she was a teacher," she explained.

She made him act out his reaction to seeing the photo, saying he was "speechless," and when she looked at the photo she started crying. McLeodd recognized her mother because of the pictures Menzies keeps in her room. Cue the "awws," because this is so cute, I'm kvelling.

Photo by Heather Mount on Unsplash

Actions speak far louder than words.

It never fails. After a tragic mass shooting, social media is filled with posts offering thoughts and prayers. Politicians give long-winded speeches on the chamber floor or at press conferences asking Americans to do the thing they’ve been repeatedly trained to do after tragedy: offer heartfelt thoughts and prayers. When no real solution or plan of action is put forth to stop these senseless incidents from occurring so frequently in a country that considers itself a world leader, one has to wonder when we will be honest with ourselves about that very intangible automatic phrase.

Comedian Anthony Jeselnik brilliantly summed up what "thoughts and prayers" truly mean. In a 1.5-minute clip, Jeselnik talks about victims' priorities being that of survival and not wondering if they’re trending at that moment. The crowd laughs as he mimics the actions of well-meaning social media users offering thoughts and prayers after another mass shooting. He goes on to explain how the act of performatively offering thoughts and prayers to victims and their families really pulls the focus onto the author of the social media post and away from the event. In the short clip he expertly expresses how being performative on social media doesn’t typically equate to action that will help victims or enact long-term change.

Of course, this isn’t to say that thoughts and prayers aren’t welcomed or shouldn’t be shared. According to Rabbi Jack Moline "prayer without action is just noise." In a world where mass shootings are so common that a video clip from 2015 is still relevant, it's clear that more than thoughts and prayers are needed. It's important to examine what you’re doing outside of offering thoughts and prayers on social media. In another several years, hopefully this video clip won’t be as relevant, but at this rate it’s hard to see it any differently.

Moricz was banned from speaking up about LGBTQ topics. He found a brilliant workaround.

Senior class president Zander Moricz was given a fair warning: If he used his graduation speech to criticize the “Don’t Say Gay” law, then his microphone would be shut off immediately.

Moricz had been receiving a lot of attention for his LGBTQ activism prior to the ceremony. Moricz, an openly gay student at Pine View School for the Gifted in Florida, also organized student walkouts in protest and is the youngest public plaintiff in the state suing over the law formally known as the Parental Rights in Education law, which prohibits the discussion of sexual orientation or gender identity in grades K-3.

Though well beyond third grade, Moricz nevertheless was also banned from speaking up about the law, gender or sexuality. The 18-year-old tweeted, “I am the first openly-gay Class President in my school’s history–this censorship seems to show that they want me to be the last.”

However, during his speech, Moricz still delivered a powerful message about identity. Even if he did have to use a clever metaphor to do it.

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