Simpsons star Hank Azaria started a compelling chat about who is America's best rock band
via Twitter

The great debate over who the greatest rock band of all time is usually centered around three British bands: The Beatles, The Rolling Stones and Led Zeppelin.

Honestly, there's not much of a debate, The Beatles have a distinct leg up on the other two, especially when it comes to songwriting, impact on culture and how they changed rock 'n roll from teeny-bopper music into art.

The only argument for the Stones and Zep are that they may have been better live performers.


Being that American rock bands are shut out of the age-old debate, actor Hank Azaria (The Simpsons, The Bird Cage) asked his followers the following:

His question inspired a great debate that spans generations.

First of all, let's clear the table of bands that were mentioned frequently but have zero reason to be in the discussion: The Foo Fighters and KISS.

Dave Grohl may be rock's biggest cheerleader at a time when the art form is losing its relevancy. But his band hasn't done anything groundbreaking enough to be considered among the greats. Now, his first band is worthy of consideration.


KISS has been dining out on only having two good songs for five decades. If they're the best America can offer up, it says something debilitating about or national character. Thankfully, they are not.

A lot of people think the Eagles are the greatest American rock band. Jeffery Lebowski would disagree.





Beastie Boys could technically be called a rock band because they played their own instruments but their catalog is too hip-hop heavy for consideration.


Aerosmith are one of the most popular bands in the tweet thread.


Nirvana is no doubt the greatest American band of the '90s, but are they the best all time?


Some people who responded had a long list of contenders.


The Dead's long, strange trip may be America's greatest.


Joy Reid from MSNBC chimed in.

Those are three incredible acts. Prince should absolutely be part of the discussion of greatest performers who ever lived in any country on any planet. However, Prince was so good he played most of the instruments himself, so Prince and the Revolution feels more like a solo act than a proper band.

Can the the Jimi Hendrix Experience be considered an American band when two of the three members were British?

Sly and the Family Stone are definite contenders.

The Sandmen enter the debate.



But is Metallica better than G 'n F'n R?


The Brits may think they invented punk, but it was started in New York City by one of the greatest bands ever, The Ramones.

1, 2, 3, 4!


The Beach Boys from Hawthorne, California were once billed as "America's Band."


New Jersey checking in.


Pearl Jam came up a lot in the debate. But, if Nirvana is the best band of the '90s, how can Pearl Jam be the best ever?



Let's not forget The Doors.


As someone once said: "Writing about music is like dancing about architecture." And they're right. For my personal take— I'd say it comes down to The Grateful Dead and The Beach Boys.

The Grateful Dead were an innovative band that went out a night without a net and reimagined their own material, in the moment and under the influence. Each member was a virtuoso at their instrument with Jerry Garcia's expressive guitar at the forefront.

They dared to take their audience on a journey and people followed them on their long strange trip across the country year after year. The current incarnation of the band, Dead and Company, with John Mayer more than competently filling Garcia's shoes has been hugely successful selling out ballparks across the country for the past five summers.

Grateful Dead - Terrapin Station 12-31-78 www.youtube.com


But as Garcia once said, "We're like licorice. Not everybody likes licorice, but the people who like licorice really like licorice." So the number one spot has to go to the universally loved Beach Boys.

The Beach Boys were one of the first rock groups to become famous while writing their own material, a few years before The Beatles made it popular. Brian Wilson and Mike Love had an innate ability to make catchy pop tunes with intricate, beautiful harmonies.

But the band would go on to be much more than a barber hop quartet with hollow-body guitars. Wilson would break new ground in the studio creating sonic masterpieces such as "Good Vibrations" and "God Only Knows."

But that's just one opinion. Who do you think is the greatest American rock band of all time?


THE BEACH BOYS 1966 God Only Knows YouTube www.youtube.com







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When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."

"Toy Story 2" got deleted and backups weren't working. Whoops.

A newborn baby saving an entire animated film production from unprecedented disaster? Sounds a bit like the plot of a Pixar short, doesn't it?

Something (sort of) like that actually did happen during the making of "Toy Story 2." (There are a several retellings of the story out there, from an in-depth interview on The Next Web to the simplified, animated version in the "Toy Story 2" extras shown below.)

Here's a basic rundown of what happened:

The film was well underway when an unnamed Pixar employee who was trying to delete unneeded files accidentally applied the "remove" command to the root files of the film. Suddenly, things started disappearing. Woody's hat. Then his boots. Then Woody himself.

Pixar folks watched characters and sequences disappear in front of their eyes. Obviously, this was … not good.

Oren Jacob, the associate technical director of the film, got on the horn to the systems crew with a panicked "Pull the plug!" They did. Were they able to stop the bleed? Nope, 90% of the movie was gone. Surely there was a backup system, though, right?

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When Sue Hoppin was in college, she met the man she was going to marry. "I was attending the University of Denver, and he was at the Air Force Academy," she says. "My dad had also attended the University of Denver and warned me not to date those flyboys from the Springs."

"He didn't say anything about marrying one of them," she says. And so began her life as a military spouse.

The life brings some real advantages, like opportunities to live abroad — her family got to live all around the US, Japan, and Germany — but it also comes with some downsides, like having to put your spouse's career over your own goals.

"Though we choose to marry someone in the military, we had career goals before we got married, and those didn't just disappear."

Career aspirations become more difficult to achieve, and progress comes with lots of starts and stops. After experiencing these unique challenges firsthand, Sue founded an organization to help other military spouses in similar situations.

Sue had gotten a degree in international relations because she wanted to pursue a career in diplomacy, but for fourteen years she wasn't able to make any headway — not until they moved back to the DC area. "Eighteen months later, many rejections later, it became apparent that this was going to be more challenging than I could ever imagine," she says.

Eighteen months is halfway through a typical assignment, and by then, most spouses are looking for their next assignment. "If I couldn't find a job in my own 'hometown' with multiple degrees and a great network, this didn't bode well for other military spouses," she says.

She's not wrong. Military spouses spend most of their lives moving with their partners, which means they're often far from family and other support networks. When they do find a job, they often make less than their civilian counterparts — and they're more likely to experience underemployment or unemployment. In fact, on some deployments, spouses are not even allowed to work.

Before the pandemic, military spouse unemployment was 22%. Since the pandemic, it's expected to rise to 35%.

Sue eventually found a job working at a military-focused nonprofit, and it helped her get the experience she needed to create her own dedicated military spouse program. She wrote a book and started saving up enough money to start the National Military Spouse Network (NMSN), which she founded in 2010 as the first organization of its kind.

"I founded the NMSN to help professional military spouses develop flexible careers they could perform from any location."

"Over the years, the program has expanded to include a free digital magazine, professional development events, drafting annual White Papers and organizing national and local advocacy to address the issues of most concern to the professional military spouse community," she says.

Not only was NMSN's mission important to Sue on a personal level she also saw it as part of something bigger than herself.

"Gone are the days when families can thrive on one salary. Like everyone else, most military families rely on two salaries to make ends meet. If a military spouse wants or needs to work, they should be able to," she says.

"When less than one percent of our population serves in the military," she continues, "we need to be able to not only recruit the best and the brightest but also retain them."

"We lose out as a nation when service members leave the force because their spouse is unable to find employment. We see it as a national security issue."

"The NMSN team has worked tirelessly to jumpstart the discussion and keep the challenges affecting military spouses top of mind. We have elevated the conversation to Congress and the White House," she continues. "I'm so proud of the fact that corporations, the government, and the general public are increasingly interested in the issues affecting military spouses and recognizing the employment roadblocks they unfairly have faced."

"We have collectively made other people care, and in doing so, we elevated the issues of military spouse unemployment to a national and global level," she adds. "In the process, we've also empowered military spouses to advocate for themselves and our community so that military spouse employment issues can continue to remain at the forefront."

Not only has NMSN become a sought-after leader in the military spouse employment space, but Sue has also seen the career she dreamed of materializing for herself. She was recently invited to participate in the public re-launch of Joining Forces, a White House initiative supporting military and veteran families, with First Lady Dr. Jill Biden.

She has also had two of her recommendations for practical solutions introduced into legislation just this year. She was the first in the Air Force community to show leadership the power of social media to reach both their airmen and their military families.

That is why Sue is one of Tory Burch's "Empowered Women" this year. The $5,000 donation will be going to The Madeira School, a school that Sue herself attended when she was in high school because, she says, "the lessons I learned there as a student pretty much set the tone for my personal and professional life. It's so meaningful to know that the donation will go towards making a Madeira education more accessible to those who may not otherwise be able to afford it and providing them with a life-changing opportunity."

Most military children will move one to three times during high school so having a continuous four-year experience at one high school can be an important gift. After traveling for much of her formative years, Sue attended Madeira and found herself "in an environment that fostered confidence and empowerment. As young women, we were expected to have a voice and advocate not just for ourselves, but for those around us."

To learn more about Tory Burch and Upworthy's Empowered Women program visit https://www.toryburch.com/empoweredwomen/. Nominate an inspiring woman in your community today!