The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has announced sweeping plans to repeal net neutrality laws.

Upon hearing the news on Nov. 21 and discerning what it means for them, many Americans responded with a resounding ... huh?

Keep Reading
More

Ajit Pai, the Trump-appointed chair of the Federal Communications Commission, wants to do away with net neutrality. This is a terrible idea.

Net neutrality is kind of tricky to explain, but here's an analogy: Right now, most Americans get their internet from one provider, like Comcast, Charter, Verizon, etc. Let's pretend these telecommunications companies built a grocery store. Big sites and applications like Facebook, Netflix, Google, and Twitter are shoppers in line. Right now, with net neutrality, the checkout line at the grocery store allows open access. They legally can't choose which lines move slower or faster. But if net neutrality goes away, the telecom companies will have the power to favor their own content. In other words, Comcast may let the Comcast streaming service use the express lane and force Netflix to get in line behind someone writing a check.

Our current net neutrality rules were approved two years ago, but Pai described the rules as "burdensome" and anti-innovation, and this week, he began the process of dismantling them, with a vote coming next month.

Keep Reading
More