"Crazy Rich Asians" was groundbreaking; not only did the film help resuscitate the rom-com, a genre believed to be dead, but it paved the way for Asian representation in Hollywood. The film opened at No. 1 at the box office and made nearly $238.5 million worldwide, proving that inclusion is also viable. But when it comes to compensating female Asian writers, "Crazy Rich Asians" is business as usual.

The movie's co-writer, Adele Lim, left the franchise after finding out her white male counterpart would make ten times as much as her for the sequel. While Lim didn't specify how much more Peter Chiarelli, her male co-writer, would be making for the film, the Hollywood Reporter stated Chiarelli's starting offer was around $800,000 to $1 million, while Lim's was $110,000-plus.

Quotes are set based on experience, and per the Hollywood Reporter, Warner Bros. didn't want to "set a troubling precedent in the business" by paying Lim more money. Lim had multiple TV credits under her belt, but no feature credits before "Crazy Rich Asians."

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When Tan Kheng Hua was offered the role of Kerry Chu in "Crazy Rich Asians," she didn't hesitate to accept it.

Though the Singaporean actress has certainly made a name for herself on big screens in southeastern Asia, the opportunity to act in a major U.S. film — a historic film at that — was a unparalleled opportunity.

"Did we honestly have to wait so long for an all-Asian Hollywood film to come out?" Tan asks me during our candid interview.

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"Crazy Rich Asians" is coming to Hollywood, and it’s making some history at the same time.    

Photo via Warner Bros.

Based on the wildly popular 2013 book by Kevin Kwan, "Crazy Rich Asians" follows Rachel Chu (played by Constance Wu) and Nicky Young (Henry Golding), a young Asian-American couple in love. Unbeknownst to Rachel, the love of her life comes from Singapore's wealthiest family and is one of the country's most eligible bachelors. When Rachel agrees to meet Nick's family in Singapore, she’s thrown into a totally unexpected, wild, and ultimately hilarious new lifestyle. The novel was so popular that filmmakers quickly adapted it for the big screen.          

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