Sarah Hyland has a powerful message about how people with invisible illnesses should love their bodies

Invisible illness is a term used to describe health issues that don't necessarily present visible symptoms. Invisible illnesses include fibromyalgia, arthritis, Lyme disease, Crohn's disease, diabetes, and kidney dysplasia. Invisible illnesses can be misunderstood, with some medical providers downplaying a person's symptoms. Others can think that the person is "not really sick" because they don't look sick on the outside. But a person with invisible illness is actually going through a lot. Modern Family actress Sarah Hyland is one of the many Americans living with an invisible illness, and recently reminded all of her fellow "invisible illness warriors" that they should love their bodies.

Hyland posted a paparazzi photo of herself in wearing leggings, a sports bra, and a sweater to Instagram. The photo, which exposes her midriff, used to "embarrass" the actress, but now she has a different mindset. "To my fellow #invisibleillness warriors. It's ok to be insecure about your body. Just remember to check in with yourself at least once a day and say thank you," she captioned her post.



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Those who have an invisible illness go through a lot. "Our bodies have endured unfathomable feats that our minds barely have time to comprehend what has actually happened," she continued.

Hyland alluded to some of the ways her invisible illness has affected her body. "With inflammation, excess water gain, and medications, my skin has a hard time bouncing back," she wrote.

Hyland reminded us that you might not be able to change your body, but you can change your outlook. "I saw this picture and HATED it but quickly readjusted my attitude and decided to celebrate it. Love yourself and be patient. We are all stronger than we think we are," she concluded.

This isn't the first time Hyland has shared body positivity messages. Hyland admitted she would wear Spanx to hide the stomach bulge from her transplants. But at the Teen Choice Awards, she chose to forgo the Spanx and let her stomach shine. "And a final thank you to my ever changing self confidence for making the decision to not wear spanx and let my KUPA (kidney upper pussy area) shine like the badass bitch she is," she wrote on Instagram.


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Hyland has been open about her struggles with kidney dysplasia, which prevents the kidneys from developing normally in the womb. In 2018, Hyland announced she had her second kidney transplant after her body rejected her first donor kidney. She also spoke about how her hair texture changed after her surgeries and had to wear hair extensions while on Modern Family after her hair began to fall out because of her medications.

It's important to remember to love your body, no matter what it's going through.

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Did you know that girls who are encouraged to discover and develop their strengths tend to be more likely to achieve their goals? It's true. The question, however, is how to encourage girls to develop self-confidence and grow up healthy, educated, and independent.

The answer lies in Girls Inc., a national nonprofit serving girls ages 5-18 in more than 350 cities across North America. Since first forming in 1864 to serve girls and young women who were experiencing upheaval in the aftermath of the Civil War, they've been on a mission to inspire girls to kick butt and step into leadership roles — today and in the future.

This is why Macy's has committed to partnering with Girls Inc. and making it easy to support their mission. In a national campaign running throughout September 2021, customers can round up their in-store purchases to the nearest dollar or donate online to support Girls Inc. and empower girls throughout the country.


Kaylin St. Victor, a senior at Brentwood High School in New York, is one of those girls. She became involved in the Long Island affiliate of Girls Inc. when she was in 9th grade, quickly becoming a role model for her peers.

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Within her first year in the organization, she bravely took on speaking opportunities and participated in several summer programs focused on advocacy, leadership, and STEM (science, technology, engineering and math). "The women that I met each have a story that inspires me to become a better person than I was yesterday," said St. Victor. She credits her time at Girls Inc. with making her stronger and more comfortable in her own skin — confidence that directly translates to high achievement in education and the workforce.

In 2020, Macy's helped raise $1.3 million in support of their STEM and college and career readiness programming for more than 26,000 girls. In fact, according to a recent study, Girls Inc. girls are significantly more likely than their peers to enjoy math and science, to be interested in STEM careers, and to perform better on standardized math tests.

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Over the past six years, it feels like race relations have been on the decline in the U.S. We've lived through Donald Trump's appeals to America's racist underbelly. The nation has endured countless murders of unarmed Black people by police. We've also been bombarded with viral videos of people calling the police on people of color for simply going about their daily lives.

Earlier this year there was a series of incidents in which Asian-Americans were the targets of racist attacks inspired by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Given all that we've seen in the past half-decade, it makes sense for many to believe that race relations in the U.S. are on the decline.

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