+
Well Being

Garth Brooks was playing stadiums but now he's doing dive bars because 'they're vaccinated'

Garth Brooks was playing stadiums but now he's doing dive bars because 'they're vaccinated'
via fatherspoon / Flickr

Garth Brooks performing in Pittsburgh, PA in 2015

We have hit an awkward point in the pandemic where concert and sports stadiums are open across the country while the delta variant is raging in areas where vaccination numbers are low. To create a safer environment, some venues are requiring masks, vaccinations or a negative COVID-19 test to enter.

In the NFL, the Buffalo Bills and Las Vegas Raiders have put vaccination mandates in place. In the world of music, Jason Isbell, Maroon 5, Foo Fighters and Dead & Company have made similar requirements for their fans to attend gigs.

Unvaccinated people are three times more likely to spread COVID-19 than those who got the jab. People who are vaccinated have about a one in 5,000 chance of catching the virus and a one in 10,000 chance in places where risks are lower.


One performer who took a huge hit in the wallet and disappointed a lot of fans by canceling his concerts due to COVID-19 concerns is Garth Brooks.

Brooks launched a stadium tour in 2019 and put it on hold when the pandemic hit in 2020. He started up again this July, but after four shows he shut it down due to the rise of the delta variant.

"The thing that scares me that you have to look it is: I never saw the second wave coming," he said. "I didn't know there was going to be such a thing. Well, is there a third wave? So you just watch this."

"I'm vaccinated, 100% vaccinated. Everybody on the freakin' tour, vaccinated. I cannot make you get vaccinated. Until it becomes a law, it is a choice. And people, when things are a choice, you have to understand and respect that we're all going to make our own choices," he said.

Brooks' team refunded 350,000 tickets when he could have kept playing and putting lives at risk.

Brooks and his band want to keep playing so they're doing a tour that will make a lot of people happy while keeping them safe. He's announced a dive bar tour where attendees will have to show proof of vaccination or a negative COVID-19 test. He believes that smaller venues have a better shot at enforcing mandates than large stadiums.

"The dive bars are vaccinated, that's how you get to do it," Brooks said in a recent Facebook Live. "So, the great thing about this is, [the fans are] vaccinated or they have to show a three-day negative in-advance test."

For Brooks, it's all about safety.

"The joy I have seen in everyone's faces as live music returns has been more than worth our constant diligence to maintain safety protocols not only for the fans, but for our band, the crew and the hard-working staff in these stadiums," Brooks said. "Their dedication to safety for the people who fill those seats has been a miracle to watch and a blessing to receive. I am truly grateful."

One day, we'll be able to put the COVID-19 pandemic behind us, and artists such as Brooks will be able to look back at how they handled the situation and take pride in the fact that they put the safety of people first.

All illustrations are provided by Soosh and used with permission.

I have plenty of space.

This article originally appeared on 04.09.16


It's hard to truly describe the amazing bond between dads and their daughters.

Being a dad is an amazing job no matter the gender of the tiny humans we're raising. But there's something unique about the bond between fathers and daughters.

Most dads know what it's like to struggle with braiding hair, but we also know that bonding time provides immense value to our daughters. In fact, studies have shown that women with actively involved fathers are more confident and more successful in school and business.

Keep ReadingShow less
Identity

This blind chef wore a body cam to show how she prepares dazzling dishes.

How do blind people cook? This "Masterchef" winner leans into her senses.

Image pulled from YouTube video.

Christine Ha competes on "Masterchef."

This article originally appeared on 05.26.17


There is one question chef Christine Ha fields more than any other.

But it's got nothing to do with being a "Masterchef" champion, New York Times bestselling author, and acclaimed TV host and cooking instructor.

The question: "How do you cook while blind?"

Keep ReadingShow less
Family

Two couples move in together with their kids to create one big, loving 'polyfamory'

They are using their unique family arrangement to help people better understand polyamory.

The Hartless and Rodgers families post together


Polyamory, a lifestyle where people have multiple romantic or sexual partners, is more prevalent in America than most people think. According to a study published in Frontiers in Psychology, one in nine Americans have been in a polyamorous relationship, and one in six say they would like to try one.

However popular the idea is, polyamory is misunderstood by a large swath of the public and is often seen as deviant. However, those who practice it view polyamory as a healthy lifestyle with several benefits.

Taya Hartless, 28, and Alysia Rogers, 34, along with their husbands Sean, 46, and Tyler, 35, are in a polyamorous relationship and have no problem sharing their lifestyle with the public on social media. Even though they risk stigmatization for being open about their non-traditional relationships, they are sharing it with the world to make it a safer place for “poly” folks like themselves.

Keep ReadingShow less

Gordon Ramsay at play... work.

This article originally appeared on 04.22.15


Gordon Ramsay is not exactly known for being nice.

Or patient.

Or nurturing.

On his competition show "Hell's Kitchen," he belittles cooks who can't keep up. If people come to him with their problems, he berates them. If someone is struggling to get something right in the kitchen, he curses them out.

Keep ReadingShow less

This article originally appeared on 01.27.20


From 1940 to 1945, an estimated 1.3 million people were deported to Auschwitz, the largest complex of Nazi concentration camps. More than four out of five of those people—at least 1.1 million people—were murdered there.

On January 27, 1945, Soviet forces liberated the final prisoners from these camps—7,000 people, most of whom were sick or dying. Those of us with a decent public education are familiar with at least a few names of Nazi extermination facilities—Auschwitz, Dachau, Bergen-Belsen—but these are merely a few of the thousands (yes, thousands) of concentration camps, sub camps, and ghettos spread across Europe where Jews and other targets of Hitler's regime were persecuted, tortured, and killed by the millions.

Keep ReadingShow less
Health

What I realized about feminism after my male friend was disgusted by tampons at a party.

"After all these years, my friend has probably forgotten, but I never have."

Photo by Josefin on Unsplash

It’s okay men. You don’t have to be afraid.

This article originally appeared on 08.12.16


Years ago, a friend went to a party, and something bothered him enough to rant to me about it later.

And it bothered me that he was so incensed about it, but I couldn't put my finger on why. It seemed so petty for him to be upset, and even more so for me to be annoyed with him.

Recently, something reminded me of that scenario, and it made more sense. I'll explain.

Keep ReadingShow less