Woman who was already expecting twins finds out she became pregnant again at the same time

A week after learning she was pregnant with twins, TikTok user @theblondebunny1 and her fiancé, got the stunning news she was pregnant again. And, no it wasn't because the doctor missed a kid when they did the first count.

She was impregnated again ten days after the first embryos took hold. How in the world did that happen?

This pregnancy is known as superfetation and according to Healthline, it's so rare that there are only a few cases noted in medical literature.



@theblondebunny1 “I'm going to be massive".... 👶👶👶so blessed and thankful. We never imagined this. ##sendhelp ##pregnancyannouncement ##herecomestheboom ##triplets
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"Superfetation is when a second, new pregnancy occurs during an initial pregnancy," an article published by Healthline says. "Another ovum (egg) is fertilized by sperm and implanted in the womb days or weeks later than the first one."

This rarely ever happens because it requires three unlikely events to occur.

First, the mother must ovulate while pregnant, which is unlikely because after pregnancy occurs, hormones are released to prevent further ovulation. Second, the ovum must then be fertilized, another rarity because after a woman is impregnated, the cervix blocks the passage of sperm.

Finally, the second fertilized egg must implant in the womb, another extraordinary occurrence, because implantation requires the release of certain hormones that wouldn't be released if a woman were already pregnant.

@theblondebunny1 Reply to @designsformiles 3 babies, two pregnancies, same time, same dad!! ##FamilyImpression ##pregnancyjourney2020 ##tripletsoftiktok ##triplets
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"Normally your body is supposed to switch up your hormones and stop you from ovulating again once you're already pregnant. In my circumstance it did not," the mother-to-be-told her followers on TikTok.

The couple learned that it was a second pregnancy instead of triplets because the third baby was younger. "The first two babies are 10 and 11 days older than our third baby, so that's how we knew straight away it was a second pregnancy,' she explained.

However, the doctor had to confirm that it wasn't an undeveloped third baby.

"To confirm it was superfetation and not just twin absorption or a malnourished baby, the doctors have been doing ultrasounds every two weeks," the expectant mom said. "And, sure enough, it's been hitting every single milestone, growing at a healthy rate, just 10 to 11 days behind the first two babies we have."

The mother is 17 weeks pregnant and wants to carry the pregnancies to the 28-week mark, but hopes she can hold on longer.

The historic pregnancy inspired the mother-to-be to create a series of TikTok videos to share her journey and ask for advice from her followers.

The couple plans to raise the three children as triplets and when the time is right, share the beautiful surprise with them.

"When we raise them, we're going to raise them all as triplets, love them equally, but one day we will tell them the story," she added. "I want them to know. It's such a special, unique circumstance."

The couple is over the moon about the upcoming delivery, but the mother has a warning for any pregnant women who follow her. "So when your man doesn't want to use protection because you're already pregnant — I would be cautious," she said.

We know that mammals feed their young with milk from their own bodies, and we know that whales are mammals. But the logistics of how some whales make breastfeeding happen has been a bit of a mystery for scientists. Such has been the case with sperm whales.

Sperm whales are uniquely shaped, with humongous, block-shaped heads that house the largest brains in the animal world. Like other cetaceans, sperm whale babies rely on their mother's milk for sustenance in their first year or two. And also like other cetaceans, a sperm whale mama's nipple is inverted—it doesn't stick out from her body like many mammals, but rather is hidden inside a mammary slit.

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Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
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Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

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