Black people asked white people their burning questions in a hilarious viral thread.

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Stereotypes, when mixed with unchecked power and terrifying political policies can result in the perpetuation of horrible injustices. But unpacking silly, harmless, and oddly specific stereotypes can open up hilarious conversations about cultural norms across different demographics.

Of course, it's easier to grasp the concept of opening up conversations about racial stereotypes that aren't cringe inducing than it is to facilitate one. Nonetheless, if you punch up and everyone keeps a modicum of humor and courtesy, it IS possible.

A recent resurfaced thread posted on the Afrocentric Films Collaborative Facebook page managed to be refreshingly funny and straightforward about stereotypes. The key, in this case, was to point the question marks towards white people.


The thread's prompt urged black people to ask white people the questions they "always wanted to know," the it rapidly filled up with playful exchanges.

‌‌Some of the questions challenged the realities of (primarily) white television shows.

‌Afrocentric Films Collaborative / Facebook‌

The classic questions of white people's relationship with washcloths came into play.

Afrocentric Films Collaborative / Facebook‌

There were more than a few people inquiring about the perpetual blandness of white people's food

Afrocentric Films Collaborative / Facebook‌

More specifically, inquiring minds wanted to know why white people's casseroles are so bad.

‌Afrocentric Films Collaborative / Facebook‌

The origin behind the much discussed "white people smirk" was revealed.

Afrocentric Films Collaborative / Facebook‌

Naturally, the thread also addressed the ways white people interact with extended family.

Afrocentric Films Collaborative / Facebook‌

Even the issue of wearing shorts in the winter came up.

‌Afrocentric Films Collaborative / Facebook‌

‌‌Naturally, there were trolls and angry peoples, as with any Facebook thread addressing race on any level. But by and large the people participating had fun and remained respectful to each other, which is honestly a rarity‌.

Afrocentric Films Collaborative / Facebook‌

This article was originally published by our partners at someecards and was written by Bronwyn Isaac.

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