7 anti-aging products that actually work
man wearing mud mask

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There is no Fountain of Youth, but we do have serums and creams and ointments that work just as good as drinking magical water. And you don't need to travel across the world on a rickety old galleon to get your liver-spotted hands on them. Immortality (or at least the next best thing – collagen) is available with one easy click. Here are some of the best anti-aging products that would've made Ponce de Leon stay at home had he had access to them.

Andalou Naturals Instant Lift and Firm Hydro Serum Facial Mask


These sheet masks do exactly what they claim to do – lift and firm, instantly. They come in a six pack, so you can stock up and save when you're feeling like the Crypt Keeper and need a quick pick me up before a special occasion. The masks contain Resveratrol Q10, a super antioxidant complex which helps inhibit cellular damage as well as stimulate collagen and elastin.

Six per case, $21.99; Amazon



Belei Triple-Peptide Eye Cream


Who says you have to use an expensive eye cream to get the job done? This cheap, but powerful eye cream contains caffeine, which gives sleepy-looking eyes a boost by reducing puffiness. A tri peptide blend supports firmness, and hyaluronic acid targets wrinkles. Plus, it's fragrance free!

0.5 fl oz, $18; Amazon


Tree of Life Anti Aging Serum


Talk about a triple threat! This pack contains the holy trinity of anti-aging skincare – vitamin C, retinol, and hyaluronic acid. Hyaluronic acid reduces wrinkles, while vitamin C brightens skin and promotes collagen. Retinol smooths and refines skin, but remember - retinol can be drying and can make your skin more sensitive to the sun, so be sure to pair it with a sunscreen when using.

Pack of three 3 oz. bottles, $15.96; Amazon


BODIPURE HandPure Moisturizing Gloves


Your hands can be one of the first places on your body to show signs of aging. However, they don't get nearly as much attention as your face – until now. These one-size fits all moisturizing gloves were designed to be touch-screen friendly, so you can sit back, relax and still work your iPhone while getting the supple hands of a 15-year-old.

Pack of three, $7; Amazon

Vital Proteins Collagen Peptides Powder


An anti-aging routine worth its salt also focuses on creating youthful skin from the inside out. This collagen powder is part Jennifer Aniston's "go to collagen routine." Just one scoop in your morning coffee can promote collagen production, which supports hair, skin, nail, bone, and joint health. Because nothing gives away your age like creaky joints.

20 oz. unflavored, $39.31; Amazon

Neutrogena Age Shield Face Lotion Sunscreen SPF 110


Sun damage can accelerate the aging process, which is why it's important to shield your skin with a good sunscreen. This sunscreen is made with a special formula called Helioplex, which prevents the sunscreen from losing its efficiency over time. Not only that, it's also designed to hydrate your skin while it protects from sun damage. And at $10 a bottle, it's practically a steal!

3 fl. Oz, $10.97; Amazon

Besito Anti-Aging Neck Firming Cream


Do you really need a separate cream to stave off wrinkles on your neck? Maybe not. But should you get one? Absolutely. This cream is specifically formulated to keep that turkey neck at bay, and many reviewers note it gives their skin a "silky feeling." Not bad!

2 oz. $14.95; Amazon

Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
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Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

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Simon & Garfunkel's song "Bridge Over Troubled Water" has been covered by more than 50 different musical artists, from Aretha Franklin to Elvis Presley to Willie Nelson. It's a timeless classic that taps into the universal struggle of feeling down and the comfort of having someone to lift us up. It's beloved for its soothing melody and cathartic lyrics, and after a year of pandemic challenges, it's perhaps more poignant now than ever.

A few years a go, American singer-songwriter Yebba Smith shared a solo a capella version of a part of "Bridge Over Troubled Water," in which she just casually sits and sings it on a bed. It's an impressive rendition on its own, highlighting Yebba's soulful, effortless voice.

But British singer Jacob Collier recently added his own layered harmony tracks to it, taking the performance to a whole other level.

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Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
True

Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

Keep Reading Show less