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An NFL star defended Colin Kaepernick — and his Afro — in 3 awesome tweets.

Philadelphia's Chris Long has some thoughts on Kaepernick — and his hair.

An NFL star defended Colin Kaepernick — and his Afro — in 3 awesome tweets.

Colin Kaepernick is having trouble finding a job playing in the NFL.

The fact the former San Francisco 49ers quarterback, currently a free agent, hasn't been scooped up by an NFL team has baffled many of his old teammates, who consider Kaepernick a much stronger player than other recently recruited QBs in the league.


Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images.

Many fans and pundits believe Kaepernick's outspokenness on social justice issues is the driving force behind his struggle to find work on the field.

In 2016, the athlete made waves by refusing to stand up for the national anthem before games, citing the systemic mistreatment of people of color and his support for the Black Lives Matter movement as the reasons for his peaceful protests.

Former NFL star Michael Vick, who was indicted on felony charges of dogfighting in 2007, doesn't think Kaepernick's politics are relevant to his employment, though. Perplexingly, Vick said he believes Kaepernick's difficulty finding a job has to do with his Afro.

In an interview on Fox Sports 1, Vick suggested Kaepernick had an image problem and encouraged him to ditch the 'fro:

"The most important thing he needs to do is just try to be presentable."

Contradicting himself, Vick then switched gears to blame Kaepernick's problems landing a team on, above anything else, his performance: "The reason he's not playing has nothing to do with the national anthem. I think it's more solely on his play."

Vick's comments didn't sit well with many people — among them, NFL player Chris Long.

In three tweets, which have since spread far and wide across the internet, the Philadelphia Eagle chimed in on the matter.

1. Long began by noting the contradiction in Vick's assessment: "What am I missing here?"

Is it Kaepernick's performance or is it the Afro that's the underlying issue?

2. Long wasn't aiming to be political, but he was trying to make sense of why a haircut would prevent one of the "best 32 QBs" from getting a job.

Kaepernick is certainly talented enough to be on an NFL team, according to Long. So why isn't he?

"Actually I know why [Kaepernick's] taking heat," one troll wrote. "Because people like you are brainwashed by the leftist cult where reality doesn't exist. How were the leftists able to brainwash you?"

Long shot back:

3. Long used his own "dirty mullet" to point out why a haircut has nothing to do with a football players' hireability.

After another Twitter user argued that "regular guys wear suit & ties to job interviews" — asserting that appearances matter for any job — Long noted he once played with a "dirty mullet" and no one batted an eye.

"We have players w neck+face tattoos, long hair, beards," he continued in another tweet, driving home the point that an Afro shouldn't be a deal-breaker.

While Long didn't explicitly bring up race, it's undeniable that skin color plays a role in Kaepernick's situation.

Since Kaepernick spoke out on the systemic oppression of black and brown people in America, his hair has become a focal point to many critics, David Steele explained in Sporting News last year.

Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images.

"One doesn’t have to wait long or look far to see a condemnation of him and his protest that includes a mention of his big, fluffy, throwback Afro — usually a crude, insulting, not-even-subtly racist reference," Steele explained. "Search 'Kaepernick stupid hair' on Twitter if you're not sure."

After receiving some backlash, Vick apologized for his comments, claiming his goal has always been to help Kaepernick — a player he considers "a great kid."

“What I said, I should have never said,” Vick explained on "The Dan Patrick Show." “I’m not a general manager, I’m not the guy who makes the decisions on getting him signed, and I’m truly sorry for what I said. I think I should have used a better choice of words."

“His Afro has nothing to do with him being signed, and I wasn’t trying to relay that message," he continued. "It was more about helping him, at the end of the day."

Now that Vick and Long agree that Kaepernick's abilities should be the deciding factor in getting the quarterback a job, hopefully the rest of America will jump on board, too.

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Often, parents of children with special needs struggle to find Halloween costumes that will accommodate medical equipment or provide a proper fit. And figuring out how to make one? Yikes.

There's good news; shopDisney has added new ensembles to their already impressive line of adaptive play costumes. And from 8/30 - 9/26, there's a 20% off sale for all costume and costume accessory orders of $75+ with code Spooky.

When looking for the right costume, kids with unique needs have a lot of extra factors to consider: wheelchair wheels get tangled up in too-long material, feeding tubes could get twisted the wrong way, and children with sensory processing disorders struggle with the wrong kind of fabric, seams, or tags. There are a lot of different obstacles that can come between a kid and the ability to wear the costume of their choice, which is why it's so awesome that more and more companies are recognizing the need for inclusive creations that make it easy for everyone to enjoy the magic of make-believe.

Created with inclusivity in mind, the adaptive line is designed to discreetly accommodate tubes or wires from the front or the back, with lots of stretch, extra length and roomier cut, and self-stick fabric closures to make getting dressed hassle-free. The online shop provides details on sizing and breaks down the magical elements of each outfit and accessory, taking the guesswork out of selecting the perfect costume for the whole family.

Your child will be able to defeat Emperor Zurg in comfort with the Buzz Lightyear costume featuring a discreet flap opening at the front for easy tube access, with self-stick fabric closure. There is also an opening at the rear for wheelchair-friendly wear, and longer-length inseams to accommodate seated guests. To infinity and beyond!

An added bonus: many of the costumes offer a coordinating wheelchair cover set to add a major boost of fun. Kids can give their ride a total makeover—all covers are made to fit standard size chairs with 24" wheels—to transform it into anything from The Mandalorian's Razor Crest ship to Cinderella's Coach. Some options even come equipped with sounds and lights!

From babies to adults and adaptive to the group, shopDisney's expansive variety of Halloween costumes and accessories are inclusive of all.

Don't forget about your furry companions! Everyone loves to see a costumed pet trotting around, regardless of the occasion. You can literally dress your four-legged friend to look like Sven from Frozen, which might not sound like something you need in your life but...you totally do. CUTENESS OVERLOAD.

This year has been tough for everyone, so when a child gets that look of unfettered joy that comes from finally getting to wear the costume of their dreams, it's extra rewarding. Don't wait until the last minute to start looking for the right ensemble!


*Upworthy may earn a portion of sales revenue from purchases made through affiliate links on our site.

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Over the past six years, it feels like race relations have been on the decline in the U.S. We've lived through Donald Trump's appeals to America's racist underbelly. The nation has endured countless murders of unarmed Black people by police. We've also been bombarded with viral videos of people calling the police on people of color for simply going about their daily lives.

Earlier this year there was a series of incidents in which Asian-Americans were the targets of racist attacks inspired by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Given all that we've seen in the past half-decade, it makes sense for many to believe that race relations in the U.S. are on the decline.

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Photo courtesy of Macy's
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Did you know that girls who are encouraged to discover and develop their strengths tend to be more likely to achieve their goals? It's true. The question, however, is how to encourage girls to develop self-confidence and grow up healthy, educated, and independent.

The answer lies in Girls Inc., a national nonprofit serving girls ages 5-18 in more than 350 cities across North America. Since first forming in 1864 to serve girls and young women who were experiencing upheaval in the aftermath of the Civil War, they've been on a mission to inspire girls to kick butt and step into leadership roles — today and in the future.

This is why Macy's has committed to partnering with Girls Inc. and making it easy to support their mission. In a national campaign running throughout September 2021, customers can round up their in-store purchases to the nearest dollar or donate online to support Girls Inc. and empower girls throughout the country.


Kaylin St. Victor, a senior at Brentwood High School in New York, is one of those girls. She became involved in the Long Island affiliate of Girls Inc. when she was in 9th grade, quickly becoming a role model for her peers.

Photo courtesy of Macy's

Within her first year in the organization, she bravely took on speaking opportunities and participated in several summer programs focused on advocacy, leadership, and STEM (science, technology, engineering and math). "The women that I met each have a story that inspires me to become a better person than I was yesterday," said St. Victor. She credits her time at Girls Inc. with making her stronger and more comfortable in her own skin — confidence that directly translates to high achievement in education and the workforce.

In 2020, Macy's helped raise $1.3 million in support of their STEM and college and career readiness programming for more than 26,000 girls. In fact, according to a recent study, Girls Inc. girls are significantly more likely than their peers to enjoy math and science, to be interested in STEM careers, and to perform better on standardized math tests.

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