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5 Halloween Posters That Hit A Little Too Close To Home...

It's that time of year, and there are scary things afoot when you go to work every day. Here are some that will make you quake in your boots. Or sneakers.Note: The text accompanying these posters was written by the creators; a link to them is at the bottom.

5 Halloween Posters That Hit A Little Too Close To Home...
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Workonomics

A Nightmare on Main Street

FEATURING: Income Disparity Between the Rich and the Rest of Us

The federal government spends nearly $24 billion each year to pay contractors for executive compensation. If these payouts to executives were capped at $230,700 (the vice president's salary), hundreds of thousands of low-wage federal contract workers could see a raise of $6.69 per hour, or $13,902 a year, for working full-time, without additional costs to taxpayers. We need federal policies that lift up working families in our country rather than the top corporate executives and bankers on Wall Street.
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Invasion Of The Wage Snatchers

FEATURING: Workers Who Fall Victim to Wage Theft

More than 60 percent of low-wage workers suffer wage violations each week. They lose 15 percent of their earnings each year on average, according to a 2008 report. Wages are stolen when employers do not pay minimum wage or overtime pay, force workers to work off the clock, withhold final paychecks, misclassify them as independent contractors, or steal tips. We need to continue to work with local, state, and federal lawmakers to create policies that reflect how scary of a crime it is to steal wages from workers!
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Silencing the Immigrant

FEATURING: Millions of Our Family, Friends, and Neighbors in the Shadows

America's immigration policies are hurting more than 11 million immigrants and their families while condoning abuse to undocumented workers. More than 75 percent of undocumented workers say they've worked off the clock without pay, 85 percent did not receive an overtime rate, and 37 percent received less than the minimum wage for their work, according to a 2009 survey.
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The Bentonville Horror

FEATURING: Walmart Workers Standing Up for Dignity and Respect

Nearly one-half of Walmart workers earn less than $25,000 a year, a Walmart spokesperson recently said. Wages for store employees are so low that according to a congressional report, one Walmart Supercenter in Wisconsin costs taxpayers in the state up to $900,000 in government aid programs for workers earning poverty wages. We need to urge large corporations like Walmart to be leaders in good jobs: pay wages families can live on and create a safe and intimidation-free work environment.
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PoultryGuise

FEATURING: Poultry Workers Facing Increased Risk of Injury

The Department of Agriculture is implementing a new rule that eliminates 75 percent of USDA inspectors who make sure the poultry that leaves processing plants is safe for consumers. The new rule increases their line speeds for processing by 25 percent. The new line speed regulation will increase risks of injury for poultry workers who process the chicken. Workers in poultry plants are already working dangerously fast line speeds. We need to tell the president to reverse this new USDA regulation and keep workers and consumers safe!
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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.