18 moving photos show the ripple effect of a female presidential candidate.

Glass ceiling: (finally) shattered.

1. It only took 240 years, but on July 28, 2016, it finally happened.

Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images.

2. For the first time in U.S. history, a major political party nominated a woman for president.

Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images.


3. For about a week or so, it seemed an awful lot like Philadelphia became the city of sisterly love, to be honest.

Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images.

4. And yes, the woman responsible for such an achievement is Hillary Clinton. But the night was about so much more than her.

Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images.

5. Her historic moment was a reminder of the countless women — on both sides of the political aisle — who helped lay the groundwork.

6. And it showed us that when women are at the top, the gender representation ripple effect tends to reach far and wide.

Interim chair of the Democratic National Committee Donna Brazile. Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images.

Funny how that happens, huh?

7. Just look at the speaker lineup at the DNC — it was filled with plenty of other political leaders who happen to be badass women.

Democratic women who serve in the U.S. Senate. Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images.

8. Dozens of women — many of them women of color — had prominent speaking roles throughout the four-day event.

U.S. Rep. Tammy Duckworth. Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images.

And that includes the very first transgender woman — actually, the very first trans person, period — to speak at a major party's nominating convention.

9. Seeing the first woman accept the presidential nomination for a major political party was momentous for women off-stage too.

Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images.

10. They wore their red, white, and blue proudly at a convention where the phrase "women's rights are human rights" was mentioned over and over again.

Photo by Patrick T. Fallon/AFP/Getty Images.

11. And some of them, like this girl — who will grow up thinking a female presidential candidate is no big deal — celebrated the convention the best way they knew how: balloons.

Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images.

12. Because, seriously, there were lots of balloons.

Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images.

13. Politics aside, it really was a night that most of us — regardless of gender — will remember forever.

Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images.

14. Probably the best shots capturing history, though? The ones taken far away from the convention, in family rooms across the country.

15. That is why last night mattered...

16. ...for the little ones who probably won't even remember it...

17. ...and those of us who've spent a lifetime fighting to see it with our own two eyes.

18. Last night was a great reminder that it might've taken America 240 years to get here, but we did get here. History has been made.

Photo by Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images.

And when that glass ceiling came crashing down for women across the country, the sky truly did become the limit.

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