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A man's 1963 answer to whether or not a woman would make a good president rings true today

It's 2020 and our presidential race was between an old white dude and another old white dude. That glass ceiling is still hovering over our heads. It might be cracked, but it hasn't been shattered yet. A blast from the past photo went viral for showing us some of the attitudes that are impeded in the foundation of that glass ceiling – and one skinny little crack from an unlikely source.

Twitter user @natepentz posted a photo of a 1763 Minneapolis Star Tribune article in which readers were asked, "Would a woman be a good president?"

Of the five respondents, four (including two women) gave a firm "no," backed up by whatever weird logic they used to justify their sexism. "No. Today their mind is one way and the next day, it changes," said Frank Kampa. "No. A man is more responsible. Women have enough problems without being president," said Maureen Mellum.


But the lone "why not" has been getting a lot of attention now, 57 years later. Vern Hause's answer was simple, ""She couldn't do any worse than some we've had."

The response went viral, and Hause got praise for being a low-key feminist at a time when "The Future is Female" t-shirts didn't exist.



Other Twitter users thought Hause's response was kind of lame – that he had no faith in the government, but no faith in women either.




Hause's response wasn't the only response to grab attention. Some people commented on how weird Mr. and Mrs. Romanowski's responses were. Mr. Romanowski answered, "No. I don't have much faith in women to let them run the country."

Mrs. Romanowski's answer was worse, and also kinda hinted that there might be something going on in her marriage. "No. A woman is too likely to give in. They might not stand their ground when they should," Mrs. Romanowski, who apparently doesn't have a first name of her own, said. Maybe she was speaking out of her own experience? Although, 1963 might have been before women were allowed to have opinions.




But as far as we've come since 1963, some Twitter users pointed out that not much has changed. In some ways, these responses from 1963 could be given now, although the sexism might be less overt.


While newspapers don't really go around asking weird questions like this anymore, in some ways, society is still asking itself that question. At least now we have plenty of people who will boldly answer, "Why is this even a question???"

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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People have clearly missed their free treats.

The COVID-19 pandemic had us waving a sad farewell to many of life’s modern conveniences. And where it certainly hasn’t been the worst loss, not having free samples at grocery stores has undoubtedly been a buzzkill. Sure, one can shop around without the enticing scent of hot, fresh artisan pizza cut into tiny slices or testing out the latest fancy ice cream … but is it as joyful? Not so much.

Trader Joe’s, famous for its prepandemic sampling stations, has recently brought the tradition back to life, and customers are practically dancing through the aisles.


On the big comeback weekend, people flocked to social media to share images and videos of their free treats, including festive Halloween cookies (because who doesn’t love TJ’s holiday themed items?) along with hopeful messages for the future.
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She's enjoying the big benefits of some simple life hacks.

James Clear’s landmark book “Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones” has sold more than 9 million copies worldwide. The book is incredibly popular because it has a simple message that can help everyone. We can develop habits that increase our productivity and success by making small changes to our daily routines.

"It is so easy to overestimate the importance of one defining moment and underestimate the value of making small improvements on a daily basis,” James Clear writes. “It is only when looking back 2 or 5 or 10 years later that the value of good habits and the cost of bad ones becomes strikingly apparent.”

His work proves that we don’t need to move mountains to improve ourselves, just get 1% better every day.

Most of us are reluctant to change because breaking old habits and starting new ones can be hard. However, there are a lot of incredibly easy habits we can develop that can add up to monumental changes.

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