Trump Jr. attacked Adam Rippon — except he got the facts wrong.

This is Olympian Adam Rippon — a self-proclaimed "glamazon bitch" and aspiring "America's sweetheart."

Photo by Matthew Stockman/Getty Images.

He's the first openly gay American man to qualify for the winter games. So — on top of his bronze-winning performance and viral one-liners — the historic nature of his qualifying has put an extra-bright spotlight on his stay in South Korea.


Also, he's not a fan of Vice President Mike Pence.

Pence was chosen by the White House to lead the U.S. delegation at the games. Rippon — noting the vice president's support for anti-LGBTQ public policies — wasn't on-board. "You mean Mike Pence — the same Mike Pence that funded gay conversion therapy?” the 28-year-old quipped to USA Today in January. “I’m not buying it.”

Many people have applauded Rippon's openly queer presence at the games and his candidness when it comes to politics. Donald Trump Jr. hasn't been one of them.

Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images.

After Rippon told reporters in South Korea he doesn't "want [his] Olympic experience being about Mike Pence," the president's son went on the offensive.

"Really?" Trump Jr. tweeted. "Then perhaps you shouldn't have spent the past few weeks talking about him. I haven't heard him mention you once???"

Clearly, Trump Jr. hadn't Googled before tweeting, because his remark isn't all that accurate. In interviews in South Korea, Rippon has largely focused on the games and his performances, only mentioning Pence when asked about the vice president directly by reporters.

At the same time, Pence certainly has mentioned Rippon.  

Pence has helped fuel the perception of an ongoing feud between the vice president and Olympian.

Rippon's remarks blasting Pence's past support for gay conversion therapy seems to have gotten under the V.P.'s skin. His press secretary Alyssa Farah responded to the accusations by Rippon as "totally false," with "no basis in fact."

But — again, for the millionth time — that's not the case.

As The New York times reported in 2016, Pence's congressional campaign website from 2000 clearly stated his support for the dangerous practice. It read: "Resources should be directed toward those institutions which provide assistance to those seeking to change their sexual behavior."

That didn't stop the vice president from brushing off Rippon's accusations and deeming the story "fake news." "[Rippon], I want you to know we are FOR YOU," the vice president tweeted on Feb. 7. "Don’t let fake news distract you."

Pence also reportedly went through the extraordinary step to set up a meeting with Rippon as well, but the Olympian — much to fanfare of LGBTQ advocates everywhere — declined the offer. (Pence's office denied the vice president attempted to arrange a face-to-face, but Rippon's agent said the reports claiming otherwise were "100% true.")

If Pence wanted this story to die in January, he's certainly done a terrible job extinguishing the flames.

In the wake of Trump Jr.'s tweet, actor Ike Barinholtz called out the president's son for causing a distraction.

"Nothing more patriotic than taunting a U.S. Olympic athlete during the Olympics," he wrote on Twitter.

Rippon replied to Barinholtz with a lighthearted quip: "The tea is exceptionally good today."

Go get 'em, Adam.

Courtesy of Verizon
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If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon

Ready for the weekend? Of course, you are. Here's our weekly dose of good vibes to help you shed the stresses of the workweek and put yourself in a great frame of mind.

These 10 stories made us happy this week because they feature amazing creativity, generosity, and one super-cute fish.

1. Diver befriends a fish with the cutest smile

Hawaiian underwater photographer Yuki Nakano befriended a friendly porcupine fish and now they hang out regularly.

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