America’s first openly gay male Winter Olympian is also … pretty damn funny too.

Adam Rippon just made U.S. Olympics history.

Photo by Matthew Stockman/Getty Images.

When the 28-year-old heads to South Korea, he'll be the first openly gay U.S. male athlete to compete in the Winter Games.

Can he get a hell yeah?


Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images.

Other male LGBTQ athletes have competed in the winter games in years past — notably, fellow figure skaters Johnny Weir and Brian Boitano — but none had been open about their sexual orientation heading into the competition.

Rippon may not be alone in sharing the title either.

Openly gay freestyle skier Gus Kenworthy could make it to Pyeongchang too.

Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images.

Kenworthy, who came out publicly to ESPN in 2015, will find out soon whether he'll make the cut for South Korea in February. He represented Team USA in the 2014 Sochi Olympics.

It matters that openly LGBTQ athletes are representing the U.S. on the world stage. And that's not lost on Rippon.

As he explained to NPR (emphasis added):

"Growing up, I really didn't have a lot of role models. And I said, if I was ever given the chance and the platform, I would share my story. ... I don't really care what other people think of me. I'm able to go out there and I'm really able to be, like, unabashedly myself. And I want somebody who's young, who's struggling, who's not sure if it's OK if they are themselves to know that it's OK."

Rippon isn't all serious business though.

In fact, he's often quite the jokester with his 54,000 Twitter followers.

Whether he's discussing his, er ... physical assets...

What it's like to be a gay athlete...

Or using familial bias to sway the judges...

Rippon certainly isn't afraid to be himself — in the rink or outside of it.

And as if blazing one trail wasn't enough, Rippon's age is also making Olympics history this year.

According to The Washington Post, 28-year-old Rippon will be the oldest U.S. figure skater to make a debut in the games since 1936.

He's ready to use his seniority to the team's advantage when it comes to mentoring fellow Americans Nathan Chen, 18, and Vincent Zhou, 17: "I always sort of feel like a leader or a big brother. I want the best for the both of them as we head into this Olympic Games.”

Nathan Chen (middle-left) and Vincent Zhou (middle-right) will join Adam Rippon (right) on Team USA Photo by Matthew Stockman/Getty Images.

Making headlines for his age may be a bit less exciting than making LGBTQ history. But Rippon's happy to make light of the decade of experience he has over Chen and Zhou. “I’m so excited that my two sons are doing so well," he quipped to The Post about his teammates. "I’m honored to be their father."

The opening ceremony to Pyeongchang 2018 is set for Friday, Feb. 9.

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
True

This story was originally shared on Capital One.

Inside the walls of her kitchen at her childhood home in Guatemala, Evelyn Klohr, the founder of a Washington, D.C.-area bakery called Kakeshionista, was taught a lesson that remains central to her business operations today.

"Baking cakes gave me the confidence to believe in my own brand and now I put my heart into giving my customers something they'll enjoy eating," Klohr said.

While driven to launch her own baking business, pursuing a dream in the culinary arts was economically challenging for Klohr. In the United States, culinary schools can open doors to future careers, but the cost of entry can be upwards of $36,000 a year.

Through a friend, Klohr learned about La Cocina VA, a nonprofit dedicated to providing job training and entrepreneurship development services at a training facility in the Washington, D.C-area.

La Cocina VA's, which translates to "the kitchen" in Spanish, offers its Bilingual Culinary Training program to prepare low-and moderate-income individuals from diverse backgrounds to launch careers in the food industry.

That program gave Klohr the ability to fully immerse herself in the baking industry within a professional kitchen facility and receive training in an array of subjects including culinary skills, food safety, career development and English language classes.

Keep Reading Show less

Vanna White appeared on "The Price Is Right" in 1980.

Vanna White has been a household name in the United States for decades, which is kind of hilarious when you consider how she gained her fame and fortune. Since 1982, the former model and actress has made millions walking back and forth turning letters (and later simply touching them—yay technology) on the game show "Wheel of Fortune."

That's it. Walking back and forth in a pretty evening gown, flipping letters and clapping for contestants. More on that job in a minute…

As a member of Gen X, television game shows like "Wheel of Fortune" and "The Price is Right" send me straight back to my childhood. Watching this clip from 1980 of Vanna White competing on "The Price is Right" two years before she started turning letters on "Wheel of Fortune" is like stepping into a time machine. Bob Barker's voice, the theme music, the sound effects—I swear I'm home from school sick, lying on the ugly flowered couch with my mom checking my forehead and bringing me Tang.

This video has it all: the early '80s hairstyles, a fresh-faced Vanna White and Bob Barker's casual sexism that would never in a million years fly today.

Keep Reading Show less