The New York MTA angered a bank by taking down its subway ads. But the bank makes a better point.

Advertisers have gotten a bad rap for ignoring people's best interests, and banks have been among the worst.

They spend huge sums of money on ads touting what are often enough raw deals. So when I heard the New York Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) was taking down hundreds of ads by a bank, I was instinctively excited.

But then I saw the ad:


Image by Amalgamated Bank.

This wasn't a typical advertiser. They weren't luring people into predatory products. They were promoting good.

"#RaiseTheWage" on a banking ad? A bank supporting a policy that doesn't just enrich the rich? I could imagine the rider response being a blend of joy and bewilderment. Of course, I came to learn that the advertiser was no ordinary bank.

Photo by The All-Nite Images/Flickr.

According to its website, Amalgamated Bank is the largest majority union-owned bank in the country, and for nearly 100 years, they've catered to people and institutions "fighting for social and economic justice."

To the bank's dismay, the MTA withdrew the ad buy because they want the transit system to be politics-free.

An MTA spokesperson said their ad buyer "erroneously" approved the six-figure deal for 1,260 ads placed in subway stations and train cars. He explained that the ads were in violation of their viewpoint-neutral policy.

Photo by Metropolitan Transportation Authority/Flickr.

Amalgamated Bank head Keith Mestrich had this to say:

"It's outrageous that the MTA would ban an ad that promotes giving New Yorkers a living wage. The #RaiseTheWage campaign is not about politics, it's about giving the people of New York a fighting chance and Amalgamated Bank is very proud to support and promote this important campaign."

We could grant the MTA benefit of the doubt, but they don't exactly deserve it.

The agency has been called out before for their selective enforcement of the policy.

GIF from "Real Housewives of Orange County."

A judge ruled against the MTA when they tried to remove ads promoting a new comedy documentary called "The Muslims Are Coming," without ever having batted an eye at CNN ads for the Republican presidential debate.

It's sad that in tough times, speaking up for working people can be conflated with politics instead of patriotism.

And it's astonishing that when a business involved in an industry notorious for exploiting people wants to sing a different and more positive tune, a worker- and taxpayer-funded agency, like the MTA, can be so quick to hit the mute button.

If the MTA really wants to be viewpoint-neutral, then they should be clear about the rules and consistent with enforcement. In other words...

GIF from "Breaking Bad."

True

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday are teaming up to find the people who lead with love everyday.

Know someone in your neighborhood who's known for their optimistic attitude, commitment to bettering their community and always leading with love? Tell us about them for the chance to win a $2,000 grant to keep doing good in their community.

Nomination ends November 22, 2020

via Brittany Kinley / Facebook

Brittany Kinley, a mother from Mansfield, Texas, had a hilarious mom fail her and she's chalking it up to being just another crazy thing that happened in 2020.

When Kinley filled out the order form for her son Mason's kindergarten class pictures, there was an option to have his name engraved into the photos. But Kinley wasn't interested in having her son's name on the photos so she wrote "I DON'T WANT THIS" on the box.

Well, it appears as though she should have left the box blank because the computer or incredibly literal human that designed the photographs wrote "I DON'T WANT THIS" where mason's name should be.

Keep Reading Show less
True

A lot of people here are like family to me," Michelle says about Bread for the City — a community nonprofit located in Washington DC that provides local residents with food, clothing, health care, social advocacy, and legal services. And since the pandemic began, the need to support organizations like Bread for the City is greater than ever, which is why Amazon is Delivering Smiles to local charities across the country this holiday season.

Watch the full story:

Amazon is giving back by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, and donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Bread for the City provide to those disproportionately impacted this year.

Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your charity of choice.
via Witty Buttons / Twitter

Back in 2017, when white supremacist Richard Spencer was socked in the face by someone wearing all black at Trump's inauguration, it launched an online debate, "Is it OK to punch a Nazi?"

The essential nature of the debate was whether it was acceptable for people to act violently towards someone with repugnant reviews, even if they were being peaceful. Some suggested people should confront them peacefully by engaging in a debate or at least make them feel uncomfortable being Nazi in public.

Keep Reading Show less
via UDOT / Facebook

In December 2018, The Utah Department of Transportation opened the largest wildlife overpass in the state, spanning 320 by 50 feet across all six lanes of Interstate 80.

Its construction was intended to make traveling through the I-80 corridor in Summit County safer for motorists and the local wildlife.

The Salt Lake Tribune reports that there were over 100 animal incidents on the interstate since 2016, giving the stretch of highway the unfortunate nickname of "Slaughter Row."

Keep Reading Show less