Buccaneers coach Bruce Arians clearly has his priorities straight with this zero-tolerance rule
via Gage Skidmore / Flickr

Bronnie Ware is a hospice nurse who has spent countless hours at the sides of people in their final days. During that time, she realized they all shared some common regrets. The most common one she heard from men was they wished they worked less.

"They missed their children's youth and their partner's companionship," Ware said, according to The Guardian. "All of the men I nursed deeply regretted spending so much of their lives on the treadmill of a work existence."

Ware's words ring true. While work can be rewarding, we probably won't be thinking about long says spent in the office during our final hours on Earth. We'll probably be thinking about the times we spent with friends and family.


Tampa Bay Buccaneers coach Bruce Arians, 66, knows that regret all too well. The veteran coach has spent most of his life in the fast-paced world of the NFL and college football.

These coaches are known for showing up at the office at 5 a.m. and leaving at midnight. When they're not at their training facilities, they're flying around the country.

It's a lifestyle that leaves little time for family.

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That's why he's instituted a new rule with his coaches: miss your kids' events and you're fired. "Those years don't come back," he told Peter King.

"I told my coaches in our first meeting, 'If you miss a ballgame, a recital, anything to do with your children, I'll fire you.' Because I missed a lot of mine. And those years don't come back," Arians said.

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"There's plenty of time in this office to work; you can come back at midnight if you want to. But don't miss that recital; don't miss that game," Arians said. "Those things mean so much to your children, and it means so much to you. The games I did get to see my son play, I know he felt different, and I don't want those guys to ever miss that."

Arians also discussed the rule on Sirius XM radio, saying, "Those kids are not going to be there forever. They're going to grow up and be gone."

Arians' belief in putting family before career is a powerful message in the hyper-masculine, intensely competitive world of the NFL, where winning is everything. In fact, a perfect example of a coach's dedication to the game above all else came out recently about Jets coach Adam Gase.

In 2013, Gase was in the running for an offensive coordinator position with the Denver Broncos and his wife was pregnant. Every day he had a 2 p.m. meeting with Denver quarterback Peyton Manning, so he had his wife schedule her C-section at 10 a.m.

Here's how it happened, according to CBS.

Gase told his wife to schedule the operation for 10 a.m. "So they pulled the baby out of me and said, 'It's a boy,'" Jennifer says. "They didn't even put my organs back and sew me up before he's like, 'You good?' I said, 'Yeah, I'm good.'" He said, 'All right then, I'm out.' They said, 'You want to cut the umbilical cord?' He said, 'No, I'm good.'"

Gase better hope he never winds up working for Arians. If he pulled another move like that, he'd be out of a job.

Courtesy of Verizon
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If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

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Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon

Ready for the weekend? Of course, you are. Here's our weekly dose of good vibes to help you shed the stresses of the workweek and put yourself in a great frame of mind.

These 10 stories made us happy this week because they feature amazing creativity, generosity, and one super-cute fish.

1. Diver befriends a fish with the cutest smile

Hawaiian underwater photographer Yuki Nakano befriended a friendly porcupine fish and now they hang out regularly.

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