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17 stunning photos show just how huge International Women's Day really is.

There's no stopping these women from making their voices heard.

International Women's Day is always an occasion worth celebrating. This year, it's especially important.

Less than two months removed from the massive worldwide Women's March demonstration, women's rights advocates and allies remain fired up and ready to go in the fight for gender equity. Amnesty International called International Women's Day 2017 a "rallying cry," organizers rallied in the name of a "Day Without a Woman" strike, and protesters around the globe once again took to the streets for marches and demonstrations.

Some groups used the day as an opportunity to brush up on a few facts about women.

And others used the occasion to highlight women and causes that don't get the attention they deserve.

Like Katherine Johnson, an unsung hero who finally got her due in "Hidden Figures," and Meagan Taylor, who reminds us that existence shouldn't be a crime.

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Courtesy of Chef El-Amin
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When non-essential businesses in NYC were ordered to close in March, restaurants across the five boroughs were tasked to pivot fast or risk shuttering their doors for good.

The impact on the city's once vibrant restaurant scene was immediate and devastating. A national survey found that 250,000 people were laid off within 22 days and almost $2 billion in revenue was lost. And soon, numerous restaurant closures became permanent as the pandemic raged on and businesses were unable to keep up with rent and utility payments.

Hot Bread Kitchen, a New York City-based nonprofit and incubator that has assisted more than 275 local businesses in the food industry, knew they needed to support their affiliated restaurants in a new light to navigate the financial complexities of shifting business models and applying for loans.

According to Hot Bread Kitchen's CEO Shaolee Sen, shortly after the shutdown began, a third of restaurant workers that they support had been laid off and another third were furloughed.

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