After Monday's deadly bombing in Manchester, England, several commentators began invoking a familiar villain: ordinary Muslims who didn't speak out soon enough.

Among the first to cast blame was British journalist Piers Morgan, who tweeted his criticism a few days after the attack:

It's an unfortunately familiar refrain after a deadly terror incident.

Where were the Muslims? Why did they ignore the warning signs? If they only spoke out more, these attacks could be prevented, the thinking goes.

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The bombing in Manchester, England, brought a raucous, joyous night of music and dancing to a terrifying, tragic end.

Photo by Ben Stansall/AFP/Getty Images.

The blast between Manchester Arena and the adjacent Victoria Train Station near the end of an Ariana Grande concert left at least 22 dead, dozens more injured, and hundreds stranded near the arena.

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Officially, there were no homosexual men in Victorian England.

But that's just because the word "homosexual" didn't enter the language until the mid-to-late 1890s. ("Transsexual" and "transgender" would catch on even later.)

There were, however, men who engaged in sexual and/or romantic relationships with each other. They just didn't identify with the same words we use today; in fact, many of them used a special cant-like, crypto-language called Polari in order to communicate without exposing themselves in public. While the rest of society was struggling to define and understand them, they went about with their usual business, living their lives regardless of words.

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