116 years after Oscar Wilde's death, the prison that housed him opens its doors.

Reading prison is one of the most notorious jails in the world.

Located in Berkshire, England, it was built in 1844 and housed inmates and young offenders all the way until 2013, when it finally closed.

Reading Gaol circa 1850. Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images.


On Sunday, September 4, Reading prison will open its doors to the public to pay tribute to one of its most famous inmates: Oscar Wilde.

Wilde was a writer in the 19th century and is one of the most important voices in literary history. Known for his plays, essays, poems, and novels, such as "The Portrait of Dorian Gray," Wilde also lectured in the United States and Canada and worked as a journalist in London.

He also bears an uncanny resemblance to the great Stephen Fry, who portrayed the late-author in a 1997 biopic. Photo by W. & D. Downey/Hulton Archive/Getty Images.

In 1895 Wilde wrote "The Importance of Being Earnest," which many consider his masterpiece.

Shortly after, at the height of his fame, a series of libel accusations between Wilde and Scottish nobleman John Douglas revealed that Wilde had been engaged in romantic relationships with men. And one of those men just happened to be John Douglas' son.

Oscar Wilde and Alfred Douglas. Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images.

Wilde was charged with "gross indecency" and months later ended up in Reading prison, where he spent two years in cell C.3.3.

His time there changed him forever. His final piece of writing was "The Ballad of Reading Gaol" — a haunting poem about an execution he witnessed while serving his prison sentence. Once a prolific and energetic author, Wilde spent his final years in exile, writing only sparingly.

A few short years after being released from Reading, he died in 1900 at the age of 46.

116 years after Wilde's death, Reading prison will host an artistic tribute to him called "Inside."

Photo by Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images.

It's a one-of-a-kind art exhibition that will feature works from artists like Steve McQueen, Ai Weiwei, and others.

"The Winter" by Steve McQueen. Photo by Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images.

Visual pieces will be on display in the prison cells, and every Sunday, there will be a guest reading of "De Profundis" — the 50,000-word letter that Oscar Wilde wrote to his lover while imprisoned.

Ben Wishaw, Ralph Fiennes, Maxine Peake, and Patti Smith have all signed on to read the letter, which takes over four hours.

Wilde certainly wasn't the only person of his era to be punished by anti-homosexual laws.

In fact, the "indecency" law that put Wilde in prison remained in effect until 1967. It was the same law that sentenced Alan Turing to chemical castration in 1952 — not to mention the thousands of others history has forgotten.

"The Boy" by Nan Goldin. Photo by Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images.

"Inside" will be as much about remembering the life and career of Oscar Wilde as it will be about acknowledging the events that led to his decline and death.

Just like Turing, Wilde made incredible contributions to culture that still move us and affect us today. Yet, he died in a world that disgraced him for who he loved and who he was.

The door of Cell C.3.3, where Oscar Wilde was held. Photo by Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images.

The exhibition will run for two months.

Even if you can't attend in person, it's worth remembering this piece of history. It's what allows us to keep moving further and further away from it, into a future where people are celebrated and accepted for who they love, not punished for it.

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When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."

4-year-old New Zealand boy and police share toys.

Sometimes the adorableness of small children is almost too much to take.

According to the New Zealand Police, a 4-year-old called the country's emergency number to report that he had some toys for them—and that's only the first cute thing to happen in this story.

After calling 111 (the New Zealand equivalent to 911), the preschooler told the "police lady" who answered the call that he had some toys for her. "Come over and see them!" he said to her.

The dispatcher asked where he was, and then the boy's father picked up. He explained that the kids' mother was sick and the boy had made the call while he was attending to the other child. After confirming that there was no emergency—all in a remarkably calm exchange—the call was ended. The whole exchange was so sweet and innocent.

But then it went to another level of wholesome. The dispatcher put out a call to the police units asking if anyone was available to go look at the 4-year-old's toys. And an officer responded in the affirmative as if this were a totally normal occurrence.

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