The Supreme Court dealt a major blow to voting rights this week in its Husted v. A. Philip Randolph Institute ruling. Let's look at what happened.

When he went to vote in 2015, Larry Harmon of Ohio was surprised to learn that he wasn't registered. He found this odd given that he absolutely had registered to vote, and had even voted in the 2008 presidential election. So what happened? As it turns out, Ohio law permits the state to remove "inactive" voters from its rolls.

The case hinged on whether that Ohio law violated the 1993 National Voter Registration Act, put in place to stop states from removing certain voters. The state argued that since they send "inactive" voters a written notice prior to purging their registration, this didn't violate federal law. The case was argued in Jan. 2018, and on June 11, the court issued a 5-4 decision siding with the state.

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After four years as a member of Missouri's House of Representatives and another four as its secretary of state, Jason Kander took a chance and ran for the U.S. Senate in 2016.

While the fresh-faced 35-year-old would ultimately come up short in his bid to unseat incumbent Sen. Roy Blunt in the 2016 election, the race was a whole lot closer than many expected. A Democrat in a traditionally red state, Kander came within just 3 points of Blunt. For comparison, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton lost the state by 19 points.

Though unsuccessful, the campaign helped Kander reach a whole new audience when one of his ads — in which he, a former Army captain and Afghanistan veteran, assembled a rifle while blindfolded — went viral. In defeat, Kander's star only continued to rise.

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Jeff Sessions just became the U.S. attorney general. Here's what to do next.

Do something with the emotions you are feeling right now.

On Feb. 8, 2017, Sen. Jeff Sessions was confirmed as our nation's next attorney general in a final vote of 52-47. The Republican from Alabama abstained from voting for himself, and one Democrat voted for him.

Despite resistance and pushback from many organizations — including an open letter from 1,424 law professors from 180 universities in 49 states asking to reject Sessions on the grounds that "it is unacceptable for someone with Senator Sessions’ record to lead the Department of Justice," testimony from civil rights icon Rep. John Lewis (D-Georgia), a different hearing 30 years ago when a bipartisan group of eight Democrats and two Republicans voted to reject his appointment to the federal bench due in part to a black lawyer testifying that Sessions called him "boy," evidence of his ongoing relationship with problematic organizations (*cough* white supremacists *cough*) — Sessions was voted into office.

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