With sports on hold, a rugby announcer is commentating on daily life—and it's fabulous

With the sports world to a screeching halt (along with the rest of the world) due to the coronavirus pandemic, athletes, coaches, and other sports professionals have found themselves totally out of their normal routine.

Sports commentators are included in that lot. It's a little hard to commentate on a sport when there are no sports happening.


But that hasn't stopped rugby commentator Nick Heath from doing his job in a creative, unpaid, but highly entertaining way anyway. Heath has started posting videos to social media of his color commentary on everyday life—much to the delight of everyone.

His #LifeCommentary posts include a video of two dogs—whom he refers to as "Vanilla" and "Chocolate"—racing around a park.

"The Interminable Wait" highlights people running the "supermarket gauntlet challenge" and waiting for the trolley as "the warm-up event for the international airport boarding gate heats taking place all over the world."

Clearly, some of the people he's filmed are not practicing proper social distancing measures, but don't let their fueling of humanity's demise stop you from enjoying Heath's commentating.

Who knew that a handful of moms pushing their kids in a stroller could be so thrilling?

Heath just has a way of making the most mundane everyday actions sound exciting and entertaining, such as this "Find a Bargain Steeplechase."

Even just watching people crossing the street becomes an exciting event. Who's going to get across first?

People are loving Heath's color commentary on life as they sit in their homes deprived of live sports commentary, as evidenced by his Twitter following growing by more than 50,000 in just a couple of days.

"It was just going and having a bit of fun and keeping my followers on social media entertained," Heath, 41, told USA TODAY Sports. "But it obviously has blown up a bit since."

Thank goodness for people like Nick Heath, who have the ability to make the most of a sincerely crappy situation and use their unique talents to keep people's spirits up in creative ways. We need these people now more than ever.

This article originally appeared on November 11, 2015


Remember those beloved Richard Scarry books from when you were a kid?

Like a lot of people, I grew up reading them. And now, I read them to my kids.

The best!

If that doesn't ring a bell, perhaps this character from the "Busytown" series will. Classic!

Image via

Scarry was an incredibly prolific children's author and illustrator. He created over 250 books during his career. His books were loved across the world — over 100 million were sold in many languages.

But here's something you may not have known about these classics: They've been slowly changing over the years.

Don't panic! They've been changing in a good way.

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Maxim Hopman on Unsplash

The Sam Vimes "Boots" Theory of Socioeconomic Unfairness explains one way the rich get richer.

Any time conversations about wealth and poverty come up, people inevitably start talking about boots.

The standard phrase that comes up is "pull yourself up by your bootstraps," which is usually shorthand for "work harder and don't ask for or expect help." (The fact that the phrase was originally used sarcastically because pulling oneself up by one's bootstraps is literally, physically impossible is rarely acknowledged, but c'est la vie.) The idea that people who build wealth do so because they individually work harder than poor people is baked into the American consciousness and wrapped up in the ideal of the American dream.

A different take on boots and building wealth, however, paints a more accurate picture of what it takes to get out of poverty.

Keep Reading Show less

"Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" (1937) and actor Peter Dinklage.

On Tuesday, Upworthy reported that actor Peter Dinklage was unhappy with Disney’s decision to move forward with a live-action version of “Snow White and the Seven Drawfs” starring Rachel Zegler.

Dinklage praised Disney’s inclusive casting of the “West Side Story” actress, whose mother is of Colombian descent, but pointed out that, at the same time, the company was making a film that promotes damaging stereotypes about people with dwarfism.

"There's a lot of hypocrisy going on, I've gotta say, from being somebody who's a little bit unique," Dinklage told Marc Maron on his “WTF” podcast.

"Well, you know, it's really progressive to cast a—literally no offense to anybody, but I was a little taken aback by, they were very proud to cast a Latino actress as Snow White," Dinklage said, "but you're still telling the story of 'Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.' Take a step back and look at what you're doing there.”

Keep Reading Show less