Science says we trust celebrities. That's why this actress and mom doesn't give advice.

Actress Isla Fisher is probably best known for her star-making role in "Wedding Crashers." But these days she's got her own set of "clingers" — her three kids.

Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images for WCRF

Fisher recently stopped by "Today" to dish on all things mom-related and to promote her newest adventure: a children's book she wrote based on a silly bedtime improv character she invented called "Marge in Charge."


Most celeb parents, and moms especially, can't seem to dodge the questions that always seems to come next in interviews or conversations like this one: "How do you do it all? What advice do you have for the other moms out there?"

Many moms are more than happy to share their thoughts.

Fisher said in no uncertain terms that being a successful, famous mom, and now author, doesn't mean she's got everything figured out.

She's got her hand in a lot of projects — acting, writing, parenting — but giving out advice to others is one role she'd rather stay away from.

“I try not to get involved and stand on a soapbox and advise anyone how to do anything,” she said. “I don’t want to come out publicly and give advice about mothering.”

In a world where parents are constantly shamed and judged for their choices (breast versus bottle, crib versus co-sleeping, helicopter versus free-range ... where does it end?), Fisher said the last thing we need is one more voice telling parents they might be doing it all wrong.

“Everyone is doing their best,” she said.

Fisher is totally right — the onslaught of well-meaning parenting advice can be counterproductive for parents and kids.

You've heard of imposter syndrome — the constant fear that you're not good enough and will eventually be "found out" by everyone. Well, parents get it too.

Babies don't come home from the hospital with instruction manuals. We buy some in the form of dozens of parenting books. We browse Facebook and Instagram where our friends preach the methods that have worked for them. We turn on the TV and listen to celeb parents who seem to have all the answers.

Much of what we read and hear is contradictory, leaving us even more confused than before.

Fisher should be applauded for refusing to take part. Science shows that celebrities wield an extraordinary level of influence over people due to their status, and while that influence can be used to promote good causes and raise awareness of issues, it can just as easily create noise and confusion.

There's a lot that parents need to know. But the most important thing, as Fisher suggests, is doing your best and finding your own way.

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