+
upworthy
Pets

Man raises parrots from birth and they have the cutest bedtime routine

It's probably safe to say that they're pretty imprinted on him.

parrots; macaws; bedtime routine; Johan Devenier; Reddit made me smile

Man and parrots have the cutest bedtime routine.

Parrots are unique animals with their bright colors and ability to mimic what people say. In fact, their impression of people is so accurate that if you're not looking at them while they make the noise, you just might think an actual person is talking. Usually, when people come into contact with a parrot, they're adults living in some sort of aviary or in a cage at someone's house.

Johan Devenier, a South African man, has been raising six blue and gold macaws since birth and it's certainly a sight to see. The parrot dad has a TikTok page where he shares his journey of raising his feathered babies...and a fox. It's certainly the place to go if you need a little sunshine added to your day.

In a video compilation posted to Reddit, viewers get to watch as Devenier raises the birds and starts them on a bedtime routine. And yes, the routine is as cute as it sounds. The only thing that could make it any cuter is if they were wearing tiny bird pajamas, but alas, I don't think there's a huge market for parrot PJs.


The video clip starts off with the birds looking small and pink with light peach fuzz covering their featherless bodies as he kisses at the air above them. Before you know it, the birds are much bigger and starting to get a bit of color on their wings. They lay in bed awaiting kisses on their beaks. In each clip, the birds are bigger and brighter, but it's the same cute routine—kisses on beaks before he tucks them into bed.

Devenier appears to enjoy loving on his macaw babies and they seem to love him right back. They tolerate all of his affection and wait patiently for their bedtime story after being tucked in.

The entire video is ridiculously cute. Check it out below.

Joy

Sorry, Labradors. After 31 years, America has a new favorite dog.

The American Kennel Club has crowned a new favorite.

via Pixabay

A sad-looking Labrador Retriever

The sweet-faced, loveable Labrador Retriever is no longer America’s favorite dog breed. The breed best known for having a heart of gold has been replaced by the smaller, more urban-friendly French Bulldog.

According to the American Kennel Club, for the past 31 years, the Labrador Retriever was America’s favorite dog, but it was eclipsed in 2022 by the Frenchie. The rankings are based on nearly 716,500 dogs newly registered in 2022, of which about 1 in 7 were Frenchies. Around 108,000 French Bulldogs were recorded in the U.S. in 2022, surpassing Labrador Retrievers by over 21,000.

Keep ReadingShow less

Constance Hall asks for domestic equality.


It's the 21st century, and as a civilization, we've come a long way. No, there are no flying cars (yet), but we all carry tiny supercomputers in our pockets, can own drones, and can argue with strangers from all around the world as long as they have internet access.

And yet women are still having to ask their partners to help out around the house. What gives?


Keep ReadingShow less
Pop Culture

Younger people are admitting baby boomers got these 17 things right

"Kids shouldn't be on phones or iPads all the time. It makes them weird."

Baby boomers didn't get everything wrong.

In recent years, baby boomers have often been the target of criticism from younger generations. The most common accusations are that boomers are selfish and don’t care about leaving ample resources (whether financial or environmental) to subsequent generations.

They also come under fire for not being able to acknowledge that it was easier for people of their generation to come of age when things were more affordable and life was a lot less competitive.

However, we should also understand that many of today’s problems are not the boomers’ doing, especially when it comes to the issues that stem from entitled children and technology run amok. In hindsight, there’s something to be said about the importance that boomers placed on self-reliance, letting kids be kids and having a healthy skepticism towards technology.

Keep ReadingShow less

Two northern cardinals captured on Carla Rhodes' bird-feeder camera.

The pandemic has caused many people to reevaluate their surroundings. When you’re stuck at home more often than you’d like, you start to pay a lot more attention to what goes on in your own backyard.

This type of introspection inspired wildlife photographer Carla Rhodes to get a closer look at the furry friends that live near her home in the Catskill mountains of New York.

What she found was magical.

“The winter of 2020-2021 was particularly brutal to humankind. After months of enduring the Covid-19 pandemic, we were now collectively slogging through winter. As a result of being stuck at home, I focused on my immediate surroundings like never before,” Rhodes said in a statement.

Keep ReadingShow less
Family

Man has a 'word of advice' for all the dads mad about Taylor Swift being at NFL games

Swift's name has become synonymous with the Kansas city Chiefs. Some dads can't get on board with it.

@curmudge_john2.0/TikTok

One dad is encouraging oterh dads to "embrace" the Taylor Swift NFL phenomenon,

Since Taylor Swift and Kansas City Chief player Travis Kelce began dating, the pop star has become a football staple.

You’d be hard pressed to go online and not see some kind of chatter about her game appearances—from the jewelry she’s wearing to the faces she makes to what she might be saying to friends during the match…it’s all the topic of conversation.

But not everyone seems to be pleased with Taylor’s version of the game. Specifically, “annoyed” men who seem to feel her very presence has ruined football as a “sanctuary from femininity.” Or the “dads, Brads and Chads” of the world, as Swift likes to call them.
Keep ReadingShow less
Family

‘Really concerning’: Researcher reveals how she instantly knows if a child is an 'iPad kid'

“There is a big difference between babies who are exposed to screens 24/7 and babies who are not."

The jury is still out on screen time but the effects are obvious to this researcher.

Screen time is a big topic among parents, but unfortunately, there are no clear-cut answers on how much exposure a child should have. Being that iPads and similar devices haven’t been around that long, there haven’t been enough solid longitudinal studies on the topic for researchers to come to a screen-time consensus.

Given the uncertainty surrounding the issue, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) says that children 18 to 24 months old shouldn’t have any screen time (excluding video chatting) and kids who are 2 to 5 years old should have no more than an hour a day.

Liva, a researcher who works with children ages 3 months to 3 years, says that the effects of constant iPad use on a young child are apparent. She says that iPad kids have parents who allow unlimited use and believe an “iPad can raise a child.” As compared to parents who allow their kids to have an hour or less of screen time a day.

Keep ReadingShow less