Over 30 and still struggling? Read this hopeful Melissa McCarthy quote.

Melissa McCarthy is the latest cover girl for Glamour. And, per usual, the A-list actress is looking fab.

McCarthy's feature in the magazine's May Money issue is chock-full of great tidbits about her own financial struggles and successes.

The story gets real, laying out how McCarthy went from asking her parents for cash as a stand-up comic in her 20s to developing "fists of justice" at the negotiating table as one of Hollywood's highest paid artists. (Hell yes.)

But one particularly inspiring observation by McCarthy came when the star discussed the timing of her fame and fortune.


After years of gaining traction through smaller TV roles, the actress became the hilarious breakout star of 2011's "Bridesmaids" only after decades of struggle. Here's what she had to say about hustling to make ends meet in a daunting, cut-throat industry (emphasis added):

"When you spend 20 years working your butt off, you know yourself better. If you’re handed everything you want at 19 or 20, you may actually believe all of the people who are like, 'You’re amazing.' I think I would have been probably cuckoo [if I’d been successful] at 18. I think the best thing I could have done was struggle until I was 30. I always assume every job is my last. Twenty years of desperately trying to get a single job gets deep in your DNA."

Melissa McCarthy and her husband, Ben Falcone. Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images.

OK, real talk. How refreshing was that to hear?

For many of us, "overnight success" at age 22... isn't a realistic thing. We have families to raise and bills to pay while perfecting our crafts and juggling multiple jobs — often, with little to no payoff.

Like McCarthy, we didn't peak at age 18. And that's OK.

Steve Carrell wasn't cast in "The Office" until he was 40. At an age when most people are gearing up for retirement, Colonel Sanders was franchising his very first Kentucky Fried Chicken. A producer in Baltimore once told a young Oprah Winfrey she was "unfit for television news" and gave her the boot.

And let's not forget about a woman named Amy Craton, who dropped out of college to raise her kids but decided to return to school at Southern New Hampshire University; she got her diploma last year, at age 94.

Dream big, work hard, and believe in yourself, kids — you do have it in you.

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
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This story was originally shared on Capital One.

Inside the walls of her kitchen at her childhood home in Guatemala, Evelyn Klohr, the founder of a Washington, D.C.-area bakery called Kakeshionista, was taught a lesson that remains central to her business operations today.

"Baking cakes gave me the confidence to believe in my own brand and now I put my heart into giving my customers something they'll enjoy eating," Klohr said.

While driven to launch her own baking business, pursuing a dream in the culinary arts was economically challenging for Klohr. In the United States, culinary schools can open doors to future careers, but the cost of entry can be upwards of $36,000 a year.

Through a friend, Klohr learned about La Cocina VA, a nonprofit dedicated to providing job training and entrepreneurship development services at a training facility in the Washington, D.C-area.

La Cocina VA's, which translates to "the kitchen" in Spanish, offers its Bilingual Culinary Training program to prepare low-and moderate-income individuals from diverse backgrounds to launch careers in the food industry.

That program gave Klohr the ability to fully immerse herself in the baking industry within a professional kitchen facility and receive training in an array of subjects including culinary skills, food safety, career development and English language classes.

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This article originally appeared on 06.28.21


After Ahmaud Arbery, an unarmed Black man, was pursued and shot by three white residents while jogging through a Georgia suburb, Ellen and Patrick Miller* of San Diego hung a Black Lives Matter flag in front of their house. It was a small gesture, but something tangible they could do.

Like many people, they wanted to both support the BLM movement and bring awareness about racism to members of their community. Despite residing in a part of the county notoriously rumored to be marred by white supremacists and their beliefs, their neighbors didn't say much about it—at first.

Recently, though, during a short window when both Ellen and Patrick were out of the house, someone sliced the flag in two and left the remains in their yard.

via Paula Fitzgibbons

They were upset, but not surprised.

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When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."