Keanu Reeves went peak Keanu when he and fellow air passengers got stranded in Bakersfield.

Keanu Reeves has made a name for himself as a man of the people because of incidents like this.

Imagine you're flying along on a short flight from San Francisco to Los Angeles when your plane has to make an emergency landing—in Bakersfield.

Bakersfield, for the uninitiated, is basically the armpit of California. (My family is from there, so I'm allowed to say that.) If you're going to get stranded someplace in The Golden State, Bakersfield is not where you want to be. Clearly, this is not your day.


But now imagine that famous actor/dreamboat/genuine good guy Keanu Reeves just happened to be on that flight with you. Imagine he's there in the Bakersfield airport, chatting with you and the other passengers and taking charge of helping everyone figure out how to get the 100 miles to L.A.

Not so sucky of a day now, is it?

Why can't all famous folks be as Keanu Reevesy as Keanu Reeves?

Some passengers who were aboard the United flight that was diverted to Bakersfield shared videos of Reeves talking about their options for taking a bus to L.A. Cartoonist Brian Rea shared some video on his Instagram, while others shared clips on Twitter.

Apparently, these passengers were treated to a surreal sort of Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure-meets-Speed scenario. In one clip, Reeves helped everyone figure out the bus and baggage situation. In another clip, he can be seen in a vehicle reading out facts about Bakersfield to fellow passengers.

“It’s population is around three hundred and eighty thousand," Reeves says in the video, "making it the ninth most populous city in California, and the fifty-second most populous city in the nation."

He also played some "Bakersfield sound" country music on his phone for the other passengers on the mini-bus. Sounds about right. (Buck Owens and Merle Haggard hail from Bakersfield. Look at how cultured Keanu Reeves is.)

All of this is just par for the course for Reeves, who gives away money like water and rides the subway in New York.

After The Matrix made the Hollywood star more than $114 million, he reportedly turned around and gave $80 million of it to the costume designers and special effects crew who helped create the film. That's just the kind of guy he is.

He's also been spotted on the New York subway, and was once surreptitiously recorded giving up his seat for a stranger. Seriously. How can anyone not love him?

Keep on being Keanu Reeves, Keanu Reeves. If I had to make an emergency landing in Bakersfield, you're definitely the celebrity I'd choose to be stuck with.

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Macy's and Girls Inc. believe that all girls deserve to be safe, supported, and valued. However, racial disparities continue to exist for young people when it comes to education levels, employment, and opportunities for growth. Add to that the gender divide, and it's clear to see why it's important for girls of color to have access to mentors who can equip them with the tools needed to navigate gender, economic, and social barriers.

Anissa Rivera is one of those mentors. Rivera is a recent Program Manager at the Long Island affiliate of Girls Inc., a nonprofit focusing on the holistic development of girls ages 5-18. The goal of the organization is to provide a safe space for girls to develop long-lasting mentoring relationships and build the skills, knowledge, and attitudes to thrive now and as adults.

Rivera spent years of her career working within the themes of self and community empowerment with young people — encouraging them to tap into their full potential. Her passion for youth development and female empowerment eventually led her to Girls Inc., where she served as an agent of positive change helping to inspire all girls to be strong, smart, and bold.

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Inspiring young women from all backgrounds is why Macy's has continued to partner with Girls Inc. for the second year in a row. The partnership will support mentoring programming that offers girls career readiness, college preparation, financial literacy, and more. Last year, Macy's raised over $1.3M for Girls Inc. in support of this program along with their Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) programming for more than 26,000 girls. Studies show that girls who participated are more likely than their peers to enjoy math and science, score higher on standardized math tests, and be more equipped for college and campus life.

Thanks to mentors like Rivera, girls across the country have the tools they need to excel in school and the confidence to change the world. With your help, we can give even more girls the opportunity to rise up. Throughout September 2021, customers can round up their in-store purchases or donate online to support Girls Inc. at Macys.com/MacysGives.

Who runs the world? Girls!

This article originally appeared on 5.7.15



The Story of Bottled Water www.youtube.com

Here are six facts from the video above by The Story of Stuff Project that I'll definitely remember next time I'm tempted to buy bottled water.

1. Bottled water is more expensive than tap water (and not just a little).

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Photo courtesy of Macy's
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Did you know that girls who are encouraged to discover and develop their strengths tend to be more likely to achieve their goals? It's true. The question, however, is how to encourage girls to develop self-confidence and grow up healthy, educated, and independent.

The answer lies in Girls Inc., a national nonprofit serving girls ages 5-18 in more than 350 cities across North America. Since first forming in 1864 to serve girls and young women who were experiencing upheaval in the aftermath of the Civil War, they've been on a mission to inspire girls to kick butt and step into leadership roles — today and in the future.

This is why Macy's has committed to partnering with Girls Inc. and making it easy to support their mission. In a national campaign running throughout September 2021, customers can round up their in-store purchases to the nearest dollar or donate online to support Girls Inc. and empower girls throughout the country.


Kaylin St. Victor, a senior at Brentwood High School in New York, is one of those girls. She became involved in the Long Island affiliate of Girls Inc. when she was in 9th grade, quickly becoming a role model for her peers.

Photo courtesy of Macy's

Within her first year in the organization, she bravely took on speaking opportunities and participated in several summer programs focused on advocacy, leadership, and STEM (science, technology, engineering and math). "The women that I met each have a story that inspires me to become a better person than I was yesterday," said St. Victor. She credits her time at Girls Inc. with making her stronger and more comfortable in her own skin — confidence that directly translates to high achievement in education and the workforce.

In 2020, Macy's helped raise $1.3 million in support of their STEM and college and career readiness programming for more than 26,000 girls. In fact, according to a recent study, Girls Inc. girls are significantly more likely than their peers to enjoy math and science, to be interested in STEM careers, and to perform better on standardized math tests.

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