Josh Gad shares one of his final texts from Chadwick Boseman: 'He knew how precious every moment was'
via Josh Gad / Twitter and Pop Culture.com / Twitter

On Friday, it was announced that actor Chadwick Boseman, 43, had died after a silent, four-year battle with colon cancer. The actor was known for playing cultural trailblazers such as James Brown and Jackie Robinson, but will forever be known as T'Challa in the 2018 smash, "Black Panther."

To give the public a glimpse of how thoughtful Boseman was in real life, actor Josh Gad, who starred with him in the 2017 film "Marshall," shared one of the final texts his friend ever sent him. The text shows how Boseman found beauty in even the most distressing times.

It's a lesson we should all take to heart these days.


Gad shared the text on Twitter and called it, "Catch the Rain." It appears to have been sent last spring when Los Angeles had just started to go on lock-down due to COVID-19 and it was raining.

"This was one of my final texts from the brilliant & once-in-lifetime talent, @chadwickboseman - take this in & celebrate life. He knew how precious every moment was. Take none of it for granted," Gad captioned the post.

"If you are in Los Angeles, you woke up this morning to the rare and peaceful sound of a steady precipitation," Chadwick's text began. "If you're like me, maybe you looked at the week's forecast and found that it's supposed to rain for three straight days — not without breaks of sunlight and reprieves of moist gloom. But yeah, it's gonna be coming down like cats and dogs."

"Great, we're stuck inside these damn quarantines because of the COVID, and now we can't even get no sun in Cali. Come on now!"

"But now that the rain has stopped and today's storm has cleared, I urge you to go outside and take a deep breath," the text continued. "Notice how fresh the air is right now, after our skies have had a three-week break from the usual relentless barrage of fumes from bumper-to-bumper LA commuters."

"And now today's rain has given the City of Angels a long overdo and much-needed shower."

"Inhale and exhale this moment, and thank God for the unique beauties and wonders of this day. We should take advantage of every moment we can to enjoy the simplicity of God's creation — whether it be clear skies and sun or clouded over with gloom."

"And hey, if the air is in the clear right now, and it does rain tomorrow, I might even put jars and bins out and catch the rain, throw that in the water filter, and I have water more alkaline than any bottled brand out there."

After the announcement of Boseman's passing, Gad shared a heartfelt video paying tribune to his friend, on Instagram.

"There aren't words to express how amazing of a human being Chadwick Boseman was," Gad began the video.

"You come upon people in your life who are next-level good," he continued. "This was a man who was beyond talented and was so unbelievably giving not only as a performer but as a human being. Beyond just being Black Panther, Chadwick was T'Challa in real life. He was somebody who just gave and gave and gave and never stopped giving."



Gad mourned the loss of his friend as many of us do. After a few days, he turned his energy from focusing on the loss to celebrating the person's life and the the friendship they shared.

To celebrate the good times they had together, Gad posted a video clip of himself, Boseman, and fellow "Marshall" co-star Sterling K. Brown, singing a beautiful three-part harmony on Boyz II Men's hit song, "Motownphilly."

On Sunday, he posted a photo collage to remember the good times they had together.

"As with any passing, we have to find our way though the grief of loss to reach the celebration of life," he captioned the post. "So, this morning, I have tried to replace the tears with smiles and revisit the many (but still too few) moments of joy I got to spend with my friend over the last few years."

It's one thing to see a little kid skateboarding. It's another to see a stereotype-defying little girl skateboarding. And it's entirely another to see Paige Tobin.

Paige is a 6-year-old skateboarding wonder from Australia. A recent video of her dropping into a 12-foot bowl on her has gone viral, both for the feat itself and for the style with which she does it. Decked out in a pink party dress, a leopard-print helmet, and rainbow socks, she looks nothing like you'd expect a skater dropping into a 12-foot bowl to look. And yet, here she is, blowing people's minds all over the place.

For those who may not fully appreciate the impressiveness of this feat, here's some perspective. My adrenaline junkie brother, who has been skateboarding since childhood and who races down rugged mountain faces on a bike for fun, shared this video and commented, "If I dropped in to a bowl twice as deep as my age it would be my first and last time doing so...this fearless kid has a bright future!"

It's scarier than it looks, and it looks pretty darn scary.

Paige doesn't always dress like a princess when she skates, not that it matters. Her talent and skill with the board are what gets people's attention. (The rainbow socks are kind of her signature, however.)

Her Instagram feed is filled with photos and videos of her skateboarding and surfing, and the body coordination she's gained at such a young age is truly something.

Here she was at three years old:

And here she is at age four:


So, if she dropped into a 6-foot bowl at age three and a 12-foot bowl at age six—is there such a thing as an 18-foot bowl for her to tackle when she's nine?

Paige clearly enjoys skating and has high ambitions in the skating world. "I want to go to the Olympics, and I want to be a pro skater," she told Power of Positivity when she was five. She already seems to be well on her way toward that goal.

How did she get so good? Well, Paige's mom gave her a skateboard when she wasn't even preschool age yet, and she loved it. Her mom got her lessons, and she's spent the past three years skating almost daily. She practices at local skate parks and competes in local competitions.

She also naturally has her fair share of spills, some of which you can see on her Instagram channel. Falling is part of the sport—you can't learn if you don't fall. Conquering the fear of falling is the key, and the thing that's hardest for most people to get over.

Perhaps Paige started too young to let fear override her desire to skate. Perhaps she's been taught to manage her fears, or maybe she's just naturally less afraid than other people. Or maybe there's something magical about the rainbow socks. Whatever it is, it's clear that this girl doesn't let fear get in the way of her doing what she wants to do. An admirable quality in anyone, but particularly striking to see in someone so young.

Way to go, Paige. Your perseverance and courage are inspiring, as is your unique fashion sense. Can't wait to see what you do next.

Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
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Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

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