Grab the tissues: A Halloween PSA about gender nonconformity has all the feels.

A new PSA encouraging kids to dress up as they please for Halloween includes a twist in the final 30 seconds that's garnering praise.

Called "My Heroes," the two-minute video by Landwirth Legacy Productions features a family celebrating Halloween in typical fashion: buying costumes, carving pumpkins, getting excited for the candy in their near future. The kids, a boy and a girl, decide to go as Batman and Wonder Woman, but the parents — especially the dad — seem a bit anxious for some reason.

After a successful night of trick-or-treating, both children are tuckered out by the TV, having eaten their fair share of sweets. It's subtle, but eagle-eyed viewers will notice that the children's faces haven't been shown since they both got into costume.

In the final moments of the PSA, as the parents tuck in their kids, it's revealed that the boy is dressed as Wonder Woman, while the girl is Batman. The PSA ends as the dad — his earlier anxiety now revealed to be that his kids would be treated differently because of their costumes — whispers, "My heroes," before turning off the light. It's definitely a tearjerker.


People who've watched it are having  e m o t i o n s.

The PSA is clearly tugging on the heartstrings of many, and its message is an important one to keep in mind.

Brian Carufe, one of the PSA's co-writers, said the production team wanted to make something that nudges audiences in the right direction when it comes to breaking gender norms.

"Society is traditionally slow at accepting new status quos, and gender nonconformity is no different," he writes in an email. "While we made the film knowing it would resonate with the LGBT community, it carries a message that’s universal, namely being comfortable and confident in every life choice regardless of the opinions of others."

But Alexander Day, the PSA's executive producer and lead writer, hopes the video will have an especially big impact on the parents and kids who see it.

"This Halloween, little boys and girls all over the world will be unable to dress up as they want because of fear they will be teased [and] bullied, or because of unaccepting parents,” he writes in an email. "This video is for them, and I hope that that child out there sees this and realizes they are our greatest superheroes for being themselves."

Every kid deserves to celebrate Halloween in a costume they love — whether they're more of a Batman or a Wonder Woman.

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The first day of school can be both exciting and scary at the same time — especially if it's your first day ever, as was the case for a nervous four-year-old in Wisconsin. But with a little help from a kind bus driver, he was able to get over his fear.

Axel was "super excited" waiting for the bus in Augusta with his mom, Amy Johnson, until it came time to actually get on.

"He was all smiles when he saw me around the corner and I started to slow down and that's when you could see his face start to change," his bus driver, Isabel "Izzy" Lane, told WEAU.

The scared boy wouldn't get on the bus without help from his mom, so she picked him up and carried him aboard, trying to give him a pep talk.

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A new Harriet Tubman statue sculpted by Emmy and Academy award-winner Wesley Wofford has been revealed, and its symbolism is moving to say the least.

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On an old episode of "The Oprah Winfrey Show" in July 1992, Oprah put her audience through a social experiment that puts racism in a new light. Despite being nearly two decades old, it's as relevant today as ever.

She split the audience members into two groups based on their eye color. Those with brown eyes were given preferential treatment by getting to cut the line and given refreshments while they waited to be seated. Those with blue eyes were made to put on a green collar and wait in a crowd for two hours.

Staff were instructed to be extra polite to brown-eyed people and to discriminate against blue-eyed people. Her guest for that day's show was diversity expert Jane Elliott, who helped set up the experiment and played along, explaining that brown-eyed people were smarter than blue-eyed people.

Watch the video to see how this experiment plays out.

Oprah's Social Experiment on Her Audience www.youtube.com

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