Delete all men from photos and see what politics really looks like.



MORE WOMEN #ELLEFeminism www.youtube.com


A record 102 women were elected into the House of Representatives last November. Now, we have 15% more women in congress than we had last session, and 23.7% of congress is female. Even though we're headed in the right direction, we're still not where we need to be. A survey conducted by the Pew Research Center found that 59% of people said, "there are too few women in high political offices." Women were more likely to feel that way. But as they say, a picture is worth a thousand words, and the best way to really see how little women are involved in politics is to see what the world would look like without men.


As part of Elle UK's #MoreWomen campaign, the magazine photoshopped the men out of political photos in order to see what the world would look like if men literally weren't in the picture. The point of the campaign was to "celebrate the global power of women's collectives in a playful, engaging way." Mission accomplished.



When you take out men, we're left with one very tired looking woman sitting in the middle of an empty room. We're left with a few women sitting by themselves, scattered around an empty chamber. We're left with a woman in charge – giving orders to nobody. We're left with a group photo of world leaders consisting of exactly three people. By taking men out of the picture, we can see exactly how many seats women have yet to fill.




The point of the photos isn't just to show us how much work we have to do to achieve gender equality. They're meant to show us the importance of women working together. Nobody looks powerful when they're completely alone. "The story of how women in positions of strength continually support and empower each other is consistently ignored while the myth that we pit ourselves against each other perpetuates," the Elle UK editors said. "We want to change this narrative in our Feminism issue and create a more positive conversation—to reflect the power of women, and to support and grow each other as we push for global equality."






Most of the women who have held office in the Senate have done so in the past two decades. While we're seeing a pattern of more and more women entering into decision making positions, it's still apparent from these photos that we have more work to do to truly achieve gender equality.

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.