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Someone cleverly reversed the roles of women and men throughout history and it's simply a brilliant must-read.

If men put themselves into women's historical shoes for a hot second, how would they handle the heat?

Author and Twitter user extraordinaire, A.R. Moxon (@JuliusGoat) shared a thread describing an alternate future where men experience the social and political reality that American women have experienced in the U.S.

It's brilliant.


"Try to imagine men's reactions," Moxon wrote, "if it was known for a fact the next 45 presidents would be women, and after those 240 years, a man running was considered 'identity politics.'

We would lose our entire minds."

"We take women's patience far too much for granted," he added.

Indeed. First of all, I find it hilarious when men—white men in particular—decry "identity politics," since the reason white males have dominated U.S. politics is because they systematically excluded every other identity for centuries. Miss us with that, dudes.

Second, take a moment to imagine 45 female presidents in a row. Just let that sit for a minute. DANG.

Moxon then moved from the presidency to the Supreme Court to continue the point. Four out of 113 justices? Come on, now.

It's not just political positions. Women have legally been pushed down and held back in all kinds of ways.

Moxon elucidated his point by pointing out how men would feel if they were denied the right to vote and had their bodies regulated by the government.

Then he pointed out the denial of higher education for completely ridiculous reasons...

...and the further ridiculousness of celebrating a tiny percentage of our country's Legislative Branch being made up of women.

(Quick history lesson: The Year of the Woman was 1992. Twenty-four women won House seats that year as well. Twenty-four out of 435, or about 5%. Not to take anything away from the women who won those seats, but that was what constituted the Year of the Woman? In 1992?? Good gracious.)

Oh, he wasn't done. There's more.

Ahem. I'll just leave this one right here.

And after all of this unreal history, no iteration of the Equal Rights Amendment has ever been passed.

But...but...nope. This history and legacy of gender inequality is ridiculous, and it's time to come to grips with it.

"I know, these are crazy hypotheticals," wrote Moxon. "Insane. It would never happen. It would be insane to treat a gender that way."

Yep.

"But if it did, wouldn't it matter?" he asked. "Wouldn't it need correcting? Man. We'd need to rethink everything."

Double yep.

Since mostly male legislatures continue to make dangerous decisions about women's health, too many people still can't fathom having a female president, and women still only make up 20% of congress a full 27 years after The Year of the Woman...yeah, we need to rethink everything.

Thank you, A.R. Moxon for making the point so beautifully.

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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RumorGuard by The News Literacy Project.

The 2016 election was a watershed moment when misinformation online became a serious problem and had enormous consequences. Even though social media sites have tried to slow the spread of misleading information, it doesn’t show any signs of letting up.

A NewsGuard report from 2020 found that engagement with unreliable sites between 2019 and 2020 doubled over that time period. But we don’t need studies to show that misinformation is a huge problem. The fact that COVID-19 misinformation was such a hindrance to stopping the virus and one-third of American voters believe that the 2020 election was stolen is proof enough.

What’s worse is that according to Pew Research, only 26% of American adults are able to distinguish between fact and opinion.

To help teach Americans how to discern real news from fake news, The News Literacy Project has created a new website called RumorGuard that debunks questionable news stories and teaches people how to become more news literate.

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A mom describes her tween son's brain. It's a must-read for all parents.

"Sometimes I just feel really angry and I don’t know why."

This story originally appeared on 1.05.19


It started with a simple, sincere question from a mother of an 11-year-old boy.

An anonymous mother posted a question to Quora, a website where people can ask questions and other people can answer them. This mother wrote:

How do I tell my wonderful 11 year old son, (in a way that won't tear him down), that the way he has started talking to me (disrespectfully) makes me not want to be around him (I've already told him the bad attitude is unacceptable)?

It's a familiar scenario for those of us who have raised kids into the teen years. Our sweet, snuggly little kids turn into moody middle schoolers seemingly overnight, and sometimes we're left reeling trying to figure out how to handle their sensitive-yet-insensitive selves.


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