Archie Bunker's hilarious take on guns in 1972 is pretty scary in today's America.

'All you gotta do is arm all your passengers.'

In 1972, Archie Bunker had an outlandish idea to stop airplane hijackings: just give all the passengers guns! (Duh.)

In a vintage clip from "All in the Family," spotted by Huffington Post, Carroll O’Connor's iconic over-the-top character appears in an opinion segment on local TV news where he shares his thoughts on keeping air travel safe. (Back then, it was easier and more common for planes to be hijacked.)

"All you gotta do is arm all your passengers," the blue-collar curmudgeon explained to laughs from the studio audience in the clip. “Then your airlines, then they wouldn’t have to search the passengers on the ground no more. They just pass out the pistols at the beginning of the trip, and they pick ’em up again at the end. Case closed.”

Check out the clip (story continues below):


As the raucous laughter from the studio audience shows, the idea of arming airline passengers back then was absurd. But series producer Norman Lear once compared Bunker's humorous take on guns from nearly five decades ago to the NRA's attitude on guns in the aftermath of the Sandy Hook shooting: A good guy with a gun is what stops a bad guy with a gun. (This, to be clear, is definitely not true.)

Although the NRA hasn't proposed arming airline passengers specifically, the idea doesn't seem nearly as far-fetched in today's political climate as it did in 1972.

In the aftermath of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting in Florida on Feb. 14, Trump suggested arming 10-20% of teachers to help prevent gun violence in schools.

Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images.

The proposal, which many teachers have slammed, has alarmed law enforcement experts. The type of intensive training it would take to adequately prepare teachers for that type of responsibility goes far beyond ensuring they're simply a good shot at the gun range, they've argued.

The "All in the Family" clip further illustrates just how blurred the line's becoming between satire and politics as usual in Trump's Washington.

Trump has helped spark another golden era of political comedy, some have argued, but he's also made it increasingly difficult for many Americans to know what's real and what's intended for laughs.

A popular subreddit dubbed Not The Onion, for instance, is routinely littered with ironic and hilarious (and maybe a bit terrifying?) Trump-centered news headlines that couldn't possibly be real. Yet they are.

Sometimes it takes the power of satire to illustrate how badly we're failing at protecting our own.

Image via The Onion.

A satirical piece by The Onion on gun violence from 2014 goes viral again just about every time another mass shooting occurs: "No Way To Prevent This," Says Only Nation Where This Regularly Happens."

After the tragedy in Parkland, Florida, gun violence hit a bit too close to home for the former Onion senior writer, Jason Roeder, who wrote the headline. "When I wrote this headline, I had no idea it would be applied to the high school a mile from my house," he noted on Twitter.

Satirical reports may be fake news, but they often speak a lot of truth. We have to do better.

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Photo by Gregory Hayes on Unsplash

"Can I buy you a drink?" is a loaded question.

It could be an innocent request from someone who's interested in having a cordial conversation. Other time, saying "yes" means you may have to fend off someone who feels entitled to spend the rest of the night with you.

In the worst-case scenario, someone is trying to take advantage of you or has a roofie in their pocket.

Feminist blogger Jennifer Dziura found a fool-proof way to stay safe while understanding someone's intentions: ask for a non-alcoholic beverage or food. If they're sincerely interested in spending some time getting to know you, they won't mind buying something booze-free.

RELATED: States are starting to require mental health classes for all students. It's about dang time.

But if it's their intention to lower your defenses, they'll throw a mild tantrum after you refuse the booze. Her thoughts on the "Can I buy you a drink?" conundrum made their way to Tumblr.

via AshleysCo / Tumblr


via AshleysCo / Tumblr

The posts caught the attention of a bartender who knows there are lot of men out there whose sole intention is to get somone drunk to take advantage.

"Most of the time, when someone you don't know is buying you a drink, they're NOT doing it out of a sense of cordiality," the bartender wrote. "They're buying you a drink for the sole purpose of making you let your guard down."

So they shared a few tips on how to be safe and social when someone asks to buy you a drink.

From the other side of the bar, I see this crap all the time. Seriously. I work at a high-density bar, and let me tell you, I have anywhere from 10-20 guys every night come up and tell me to, "serve her a stronger drink, I'm trying to get lucky tonight, know what I mean?" usually accompanied with a wink and a gesture at a girl who, in my experience, is going to go from mildly buzzed to definitively hammered if I keep serving her. Now, I like to think I'm a responsible bartender, so I usually tell guys like that to piss off, and, if I can, try to tell the girl's more sober friends that they need to keep an eye on her.
But everyone- just so you know, most of the time, when someone you don't know is buying you a drink, they're NOT doing it out of a sense of cordiality, they're buying you a drink for the sole purpose of making you let your guard down.

Tips for getting drinks-

1. ALWAYS GO TO THE BAR TO GET YOUR OWN DRINK, DO NOT LET STRANGERS CARRY YOUR DRINKS. This is an opportune time for dropping something into your cocktail, and you're none the wiser.

2.IF YOU ORDER SOMETHING NON-ALCOHOLIC, I promise you, the bartender doesn't give two shits that you're not drinking cocktails with your friends, and often, totally understands that you don't want to let your guard down around strangers. Usually, you can just tell the bartender that you'd like something light, and that's a big clue to us that you're uncomfortable with whomever you're standing next to. Again, we see this all the time.

3. If you're in a position to where you feel uncomfortable not ordering alcohol:
Here's a list of light liquors, and mixers that won't get you drunk, and will still look like an actual cocktail:

X-rated + sprite = easy to drink, sweet, and 12% alcoholic content. Not strong at all, usually runs $6-$8, depending on your state.
Amaretto + sour= sweet, not strong, 26%.
Peach Schnapps+ ginger ale= tastes like mellow butterscotch, 24%.
Melon liquor (Midori, in most bars) + soda water = not overly sweet, 21%
Coffee liquor (Kahlua) +soda = not super sweet, 20%.
Hope this helps someone out!

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If you do accept a drink from someone at a bar and you want to talk, there's no need to feel obligated to spend the rest of the night with them.

Jaqueline Whitmore, founder of The Protocol School of Palm Beach, says to be polite you only have to "Engage in some friendly chit-chat, but you are not obligated to do more than that."

If someone asks to buy you a drink and you don't want it, Whitmore has a great tip. "Say thank you, but you are trying to cut back, have to drive or you don't accept drinks from strangers," Whitmore says.

What if they've already sent the drink over? "Give the drink to the bartender and tell him or her to enjoy it," Whitmore says.

Have fun. Stay safe, and make sure to bring a great wing-man or wing-woman with you.

Well Being
Photo by Artem Beliaikin on Unsplash

Jasmine has been used as a natural treatment for depression, anxiety, and stress for thousands of years. Oil from the plant has also been used to treat insomnia and PMS, and is considered a natural aphrodisiac. It turns out, our ancestor's instincts to slather on the oil when they wanted a little R&R were correct.

A study, published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, and according to Professor Hanns Hatt of the Ruhr University in Bochum, Germany, revealed that jasmine can calm you down when you're feeling anxious.The results can "be seen as evidence of a scientific basis for aromatherapy."

"Instead of a sleeping pill or a mood enhancer, a nose full of jasmine from Gardenia jasminoides could also help, according to researchers in Germany. They have discovered that the two fragrances Vertacetal-coeur (VC) and the chemical variation (PI24513) have the same molecular mechanism of action and are as strong as the commonly prescribed barbiturates or propofol," says the study.

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Nature


Rep. Peter King (R-NY) is a name you should remember. If you don't follow politics closely, remember his name because he's the first Republican in Congress to openly join the call for a renewed federal ban on assault weapons.

If you're a Democrat or a diehard progressive partisan, remember his name because it's proof that as a nation we can put principles before party and walk across the political aisle to get things done.

If you're a Republican, remember his name as evidence that real leadership in politics sometimes means risking your reputation to do what is right even when most of your colleagues disagree or lack the political courage to go first.

But let's allow Rep. King to explain himself in his own words:

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Democracy