Another reason to love Australia? Doodlebug the orphaned kangaroo lives there.

They say good things come in threes.

(... or is it "good things come in small packages"?)

Take, for instance, these three things:


1. An adorable baby kangaroo exists. He lives in Australia, and he's an orphan.

2. His name is Doodlebug. Because of course it is. That's the best kangaroo name ever.

3. He was recently photographed hugging his favorite teddy bear. And to say that it's adorable is quite the understatement.

Here's proof these three things did indeed occur:

That almost too-cute-to-be-real image of Doodlebug hugging his furry inanimate friend was tweeted by Tim Beshara, a Tasmania-based media adviser, on Aug. 4, 2015. (And, yes, Tim tweeted "wallaby" but later clarified that Doodlebug is a kangaroo. The difference is tricky!)

The pic has taken the Internet by storm ever since, racking up 4,800 retweets.

Beshara's mom, Gillian Abbott — who spends her time caring for injured and orphaned creatures on her property in New South Wales, Australia — had sent him the image of the 15-month-old. Months ago, she spotted the little guy, weighing just about 3.5 pounds, on the side of the road.

"We don't know whether his mother had died either through a car accident or a dog attack," Beshara explained to CBS News. "Or whether he simply was abandoned."

But Doodblebug has found solace in his furry friend, which he cuddles and lays in the grass with, according to Beshara.

While spotting a kangaroo might seem exceedingly rare to those outside Australia, it's not quite as out of the ordinary to those living Down Under — according to the Australian Wildlife Society, the kangaroo population is estimated at a whopping 60 million across the island country — the highest it's ever been.

This particular "roo," as an Aussie might say, seems to have found a (somewhat permanent) home on Abbott's property for now.

"He is undergoing what is called a 'soft-release,' which means he is able to roam in the nearby forest but comes home for occasional extra feeding," Beshara told ABC News.

So, if you're ever in Australia and spot a kangaroo cuddling a teddy bear, know you're not hallucinating. It's just Doodlebug.

Courtesy of Verizon
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If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon

Photo by Spikeball on Unsplash

It's been 19 months since the first case of COVID-19 was identified in Wuhan, China, and since that time, a lot has changed. Cities, states, and entire countries endured rolling shutdowns — or lockdowns. Business shuttered and schools were closed, and life as we knew it changed. From mask mandates to social distancing, every action and behavior was altered. But as infection rates begin to drop, we are making a comeback. Restaurants, movie theaters, and malls are (now) open. Business is (more or less) back, and this fall, most children will return to the classroom. In-person education will resume. But what does life look like in a post-pandemic world, particularly for the youngest members of our society?

"The COVID-19 pandemic affected our kids in many ways that we don't yet fully understand," Laura Lofy — a licensed psychologist and school psychologist — tells Upworthy. "Some desperately missed their classmates. Others fell behind on schoolwork, and some became riddled with anxiety and fear. Many regressed on skills they had developed or lost momentum in areas in which they had been making progress." And one of those areas is interpersonal, i.e. many children are struggling socially, and this has the potential to have a long-lasting impact on our children and the next generation.


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