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An unlikely antidote for a tough news day? A coloring book page.

There's a way to find hope. It might start with crayons.

An unlikely antidote for a tough news day? A coloring book page.

I'm not the only one who watches the news (or my Facebook feed, Twitter, AP news alerts, MSNBC, etc.) and feels my blood pressure rise, right?


GIF via "The Office"/NBC.

It's a rough world out there right now. But artist Andrea Pippins has a solution:

An adult coloring book!

But this isn't just any coloring book. Instead, it's art that allows people to, as Pippins says, "see the beauty and light in themselves."

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD!

You probably know that the old standard activity for kiddos — the coloring book — has become new again for adults.

When asked about the psychological benefits of coloring, Marti Faist, an art therapist, told the Baltimore Sun, "I've watched people under acute stress, almost panic-attack levels, color and have their blood pressure go down very quickly. It's cathartic for them."

But Pippins' coloring book is even more special, timely, and profound than the gorgeous mandalas your friend from work is probably coloring.

Behold! The gorgeous mandalas that my friend from work IS coloring! Photo and coloring skills by Jenni Gritters/Upworthy.

Pippins created the Freedom coloring-book page to take therapeutic coloring to a new level.

The page is made to help us deal with tragedies, process our emotions, and think about how to move forward.

It's both a coloring book and a journal in one.

It has prompts like:



and

and

And it's free to download!

So today, print that thing out. Then unplug. And shut down those screens.

Now get your crayons, y'all, and let's talk about news cycle self-care, shall we?

Pippins wants to empower folks and help them process their feelings in the best way.

"I strongly believe that when we allow ourselves to feel what's happening and then put pen to paper some thoughts on how to make change, something happens," she says. "Ideas began to emerge and we start to see some solutions, and also feel that change is possible."

When the news is tough and feelings run high, it's easy to just shut down and shut in.

But reaching out and connecting is often the best way to heal.

In an interview with Mequilibrium, psychologist and stress expert Andrew Shatté said that the more you expand, reach out, and form connections to friends, neighbors, your community, and the world around you, the less alone you'll feel.

"The bigger your boat, the less likely you’ll capsize."

Pippins' coloring-book page provides a much-needed place to begin conversations.

They could be conversations about ourselves, our feelings, our country, or our hopes and fears.

As Pippins told Upworthy: "I just hope folks, especially kids, find peace in doing the prompts. To recognize that even in moments of despair we have a voice and can take action. "

So if you haven't downloaded it yet ... what are you waiting for?

Print out a bunch and drop 'em off at your favorite local hangout, or just keep one all to yourself! *runs to printer*

Motherhood is a journey unlike any other, and one that is nearly impossible to prepare for. No matter how many parenting books you read, how many people you talk to, how many articles you peruse before having kids, your children will emerge as completely unique creatures who impact your world in ways you could never have anticipated.

Those of us who have been parenting for a while have some wisdom to share from experience. Not that older moms know everything, of course, but hindsight can offer some perspective that's hard to find when you're in the thick of early motherhood.

Upworthy asked our readers who are moms what they wish they could tell their younger selves about motherhood, and the responses were both honest and wholesome. Here's what they said:

Lighten up. Don't sweat the small stuff.

One of the most common responses was to stop worrying about the little things so much, try to be present with your kids, and enjoy the time you have with them:

"Relax and enjoy them. If your house is a mess, so be it. Stay in the moment as they are temporary..more so than you think, sometimes. We lost our beautiful boy to cancer 15+yrs ago. I loved him more than life itself..💔 "- Janet

"Don't worry about the dishes, laundry and other chores. Read the kids another book. Go outside and make a mud pie. Throw the baseball around a little longer. Color another picture. Take more pictures and make sure you are in the pictures too! My babies are 19 and 17 and I would give anything to relive an ordinary Saturday from 15 years ago." - Emma H.

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Photo by Daniel Schludi on Unsplash
True

The global eradication of smallpox in 1980 is one of international public health's greatest successes. But in 1966, seven years after the World Health Organization announced a plan to rid the world of the disease, smallpox was still widespread. The culprits? A lack of funds, personnel and vaccine supply.

Meanwhile, outbreaks across South America, Africa, and Asia continued, as the highly contagious virus continued to kill three out of every 10 people who caught it, while leaving many survivors disfigured. It took a renewed commitment of resources from wealthy nations to fulfill the promise made in 1959.

Forty-one years later, although we face a different virus, the potential for vast destruction is just as great, and the challenges of funding, personnel and supply are still with us, along with last-mile distribution. Today, while 30% of the U.S. population is fully vaccinated, with numbers rising every day, there is an overwhelming gap between wealthy countries and the rest of the world. It's becoming evident that the impact on the countries getting left behind will eventually boomerang back to affect us all.

Photo by ismail mohamed - SoviLe on Unsplash

The international nonprofit CARE recently released a policy paper that lays out the case for U.S. investment in a worldwide vaccination campaign. Founded 75 years ago, CARE works in over 100 countries and reaches more than 90 million people around the world through multiple humanitarian aid programs. Of note is the organization's worldwide reputation for its unshakeable commitment to the dignity of people; they're known for working hand-in-hand with communities and hold themselves to a high standard of accountability.

"As we enter into our second year of living with COVID-19, it has become painfully clear that the safety of any person depends on the global community's ability to protect every person," says Michelle Nunn, CARE USA's president and CEO. "While wealthy nations have begun inoculating their populations, new devastatingly lethal variants of the virus continue to emerge in countries like India, South Africa and Brazil. If vaccinations don't effectively reach lower-income countries now, the long-term impact of COVID-19 will be catastrophic."

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