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An unlikely antidote for a tough news day? A coloring book page.

There's a way to find hope. It might start with crayons.

An unlikely antidote for a tough news day? A coloring book page.

I'm not the only one who watches the news (or my Facebook feed, Twitter, AP news alerts, MSNBC, etc.) and feels my blood pressure rise, right?


GIF via "The Office"/NBC.

It's a rough world out there right now. But artist Andrea Pippins has a solution:

An adult coloring book!

But this isn't just any coloring book. Instead, it's art that allows people to, as Pippins says, "see the beauty and light in themselves."

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD!

You probably know that the old standard activity for kiddos — the coloring book — has become new again for adults.

When asked about the psychological benefits of coloring, Marti Faist, an art therapist, told the Baltimore Sun, "I've watched people under acute stress, almost panic-attack levels, color and have their blood pressure go down very quickly. It's cathartic for them."

But Pippins' coloring book is even more special, timely, and profound than the gorgeous mandalas your friend from work is probably coloring.

Behold! The gorgeous mandalas that my friend from work IS coloring! Photo and coloring skills by Jenni Gritters/Upworthy.

Pippins created the Freedom coloring-book page to take therapeutic coloring to a new level.

The page is made to help us deal with tragedies, process our emotions, and think about how to move forward.

It's both a coloring book and a journal in one.

It has prompts like:



and

and

And it's free to download!

So today, print that thing out. Then unplug. And shut down those screens.

Now get your crayons, y'all, and let's talk about news cycle self-care, shall we?

Pippins wants to empower folks and help them process their feelings in the best way.

"I strongly believe that when we allow ourselves to feel what's happening and then put pen to paper some thoughts on how to make change, something happens," she says. "Ideas began to emerge and we start to see some solutions, and also feel that change is possible."

When the news is tough and feelings run high, it's easy to just shut down and shut in.

But reaching out and connecting is often the best way to heal.

In an interview with Mequilibrium, psychologist and stress expert Andrew Shatté said that the more you expand, reach out, and form connections to friends, neighbors, your community, and the world around you, the less alone you'll feel.

"The bigger your boat, the less likely you’ll capsize."

Pippins' coloring-book page provides a much-needed place to begin conversations.

They could be conversations about ourselves, our feelings, our country, or our hopes and fears.

As Pippins told Upworthy: "I just hope folks, especially kids, find peace in doing the prompts. To recognize that even in moments of despair we have a voice and can take action. "

So if you haven't downloaded it yet ... what are you waiting for?

Print out a bunch and drop 'em off at your favorite local hangout, or just keep one all to yourself! *runs to printer*

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.