America's mayors look to bypass Trump and take part in the UN climate change conference

The great thing about American democracy is the separation of powers. The federal government has rights, states have rights, counties have rights, cities have rights, and we, as people, have rights, too.

Heck, even animals have some rights in the good ol' U S of A.

The president of the United States is not a king or a dictator so a team of U.S. mayors, led by Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, are asking to go over his head to negotiate directly at next month's UN climate change conference in Santiago, Chile.


Garcetti said he will ask the UN secretary general, António Guterres, to give American cities a new role in UN climate talks

Eric Garcetti / Flickr

"I'm going to bring it up with the UN secretary general," Garcetti said according to The Guardian. "If cities are invited to be at the table, I believe they will help accelerate the work that needs to be done. Hopefully, we can do it in concert with our national governments, but [we can do it] even where there is conflict."

"The United Nations works directly with cities all the time ... so they shouldn't feel scared about jumping down to that local level," he continued. Garcetti made this announcement at the C40 World Mayors Summit where mayors of more than 90 of the world's biggest cities voiced support for a Global Green New Deal.

RELATED: A plaque addressed 'to the future' marks Iceland's first glacier lost to the climate crisis

"This will be my priority as the new chair, to deliver a Green New Deal in the face of the climate emergency and to make the 2020s the decade of human action," he said.

"This will be the defining decade not only of our lives, but of life itself for human beings on this planet. I have no doubt that we can and will get it right, because human beings have this stubborn desire to survive."

via Amie June / Flickr

The L.A. mayor brought together a coalition of 435 mayors, representing over 70 million Americans, in 2017 after Donald Trump took the U.S. out of the Paris Climate agreement, to create the Climate Mayors organisation.

RELATED: Breaking down the conspiracy theory mindset at the heart of climate change denial

"When [Trump] pulled out of Paris, the mayors jumped in," Boston mayor Marty Walsh told the Guardian at the conference. "I think that Donald Trump's inaction in the long run hopefully will be good for the climate, because it's energized and activated more mayors to do more."

Putting America's mayors at the negotiation table at the UN would be a bold move to diminish Trump's power. But it's a necessary one at a time when the federal government is shirking its responsibility to help the climate crisis.

Garcetti believes that Trump's climate denial is party due to his ignorance on the topic. "One, he's denying it for his friends in certain industries, and number two, I think he's denying it because he knows nothing about it," he said.







Image by 5540867 from Pixabay

Figuring out what to do for a mom on Mother's Day can be a tricky thing. There's the standard flowers or candy, of course, and taking her out to a nice brunch is a fairly universal winner. But what do moms really want?

Speaking from experience—my kids range from age 12 to 20—a lot depends on the stage of motherhood. What I wanted when my kids were little is different than what I want now, and I'm sure when my kids are grown and gone I'll want something different again.

We asked our readers to share what they want for Mother's Day, and while the answers were varied, there were some common themes that emerged.

Moms of young kids want a break.

When your kids are little, motherhood is relentless. Precious and adorable, yes. Wonderful and rewarding, absolutely. But it's a LOT. And it's a lot all the fricking time.

Most moms I know would love the gift of alone time, either away at a hotel or Airbnb or in their own home with no one else around. Time alone is a priceless commodity at this stage, especially if it comes with someone else taking care of cleaning, making sure the kids are fed and safe and occupied, doing the laundry, etc.

This is especially true after more than a year of pandemic living, where we moms have spent more time than usual at home with our offspring. While in some ways that's been great, again, it's a lot.

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"I love being a nurse because I have the honor of connecting with my patients during some of their best and some of their worst days and making a difference in their lives is among the most rewarding things that I can do in my own life" - Tenesia Richards, RN

From ushering new life into the world to holding the hand of a patient as they take their last breath, nurses are everyday heroes that deserve our respect and appreciation.

To give back to this community that is always giving so selflessly to others, CeraVe® put out a call to nurses to share their stories for a chance to be featured in Heroes Behind the Masks, a digital content series shining a light on nurses who go above and beyond to provide safe and quality care to patients and their communities.

First up: Tenesia Richards, a labor and delivery nurse working in New York City who, in addition to her regular job, started a community outreach program in a homeless shelter that houses expectant mothers for up to one year postpartum.

Tenesia | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

Upon learning at a conference that black mothers in the U.S. die at three to four times the rate of white mothers, one of the widest of all racial disparities in women's health, Richards decided to take further action to help her community. She, along with a handful of fellow nurses, volunteered to provide antepartum, childbirth and postpartum education to the women living at the shelter. Additionally, they looked for other ways to boost the spirits of the residents, like throwing baby showers and bringing in guest speakers. When COVID-19 hit and in-person gatherings were no longer possible, Richards and her team found creative workarounds and created holiday care packages for the mothers instead.

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