After Cannes turned away women wearing flats, actress Rashida Jones responded with her own rule.

It's 2015 and I cannes't believe that the Cannes Film Festival thought enforcing this shoe policy was a good idea.

The Cannes Film Festival found itself in a bit of hot water last week when several women were refused entry to a film premiere.

They weren't turned away because they were drunk, or disorderly, or causing a scene.

It wasn't because they didn't have tickets or weren't supposed to be there in the first place.


In fact, one of the women turned away was the wife of director Asif Kapadia whose documentary about Amy Winehouse premiered at the festival.


No, it wasn't any of those reasons. These women were turned away because they weren't wearing ... heels?

As Andreas Wiseman reported over at ScreenDaily:

"In a bad PR move for the push for gender equality, a handful of women in their 50s were turned away from the screening of Todd Haynes' competition entry Carol [the film's feminist appeal further ironising the shut-out] on Sunday night after being told the height of their smart footwear didn't pass muster.

Multiple guests, some older with medical conditions, were denied access to the anticipated world-premiere screening for wearing rhinestone flats."

That medical condition, by the way? One of the women turned away was film producer Valeria Richter who has part of her left foot amputated. It is not actually possible for her to balance in heels.

So, before you ask how the hell was this even enforced, let's ask ourselves a larger question: How is it 2015 and we still have rules like this?

Did someone check to make sure actresses Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara (pictured below at the same premiere where the other women were turned away) weren't secretly hiding a pair of rhinestone flats beneath their fashionable gowns? For all we know they both wore wooden clogs or fluffy slippers and no one was the wiser (the horror!).

Who knows what kind of footwear is hiding under those gowns? More importantly, why should it matter? Photo by Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images.

On Twitter, Melissa Cole started the hashtag #showmeyourflats as a way of responding to the controversy.


While other Twitter users provided a little perspective:


And, of course, after facing much criticism from celebrities like Bette Midler...


...and actress Emily Blunt, who was backed up by British national treasure Stephen Fry...

Cannes clarified its policy saying that heel height was never part of its dress code rules to begin with ... but also that the festival's hosts were reminded to enforce it.

It was very confusing. Read for yourself:

"Regarding the dress code for the red carpet screenings, rules have not changed throughout the years (Tuxedo, formal dress for Gala screenings) and there is no specific mention about the height of the women's heels as well as for men's. Thus, in order to make sure that this rule is respected, the festival's hosts and hostesses were reminded of it."

Thierry Fremaux, the festival's director, was much clearer when he apologized and conceded the policy was wrong saying, "there was perhaps a small moment of over-zealousness [in the enforcement of the black tie dress code]."

Not everyone is so quick to forgive and forget though.

In a recent appearance on "The Nightly Show," actress Rashida Jones dropped the mic on Cannes with a rule of her own.

@rashidajones on women wearing flats being turned away from the Cannes red carpet. #NightlyShow
A photo posted by The Nightly Show (@thenightlyshow) on

YES. YES. YES. Brilliant.

I'd like to sarcastically thank Cannes for the fantastic reminder that sexism can bubble up in the weirdest ways.

And I'd like to sincerely thank Rashida Jones for taking a "Cannes"-do attitude to a "Cannes"-don't dress code and giving people everywhere the best line ever for responding to ridiculous dress codes.

More

What's better than a heartwarming story of holiday cheer? How about a heartwarming story that turns out to be a hilarious moment of holiday embarrassment?

Mary Katherine Backstrom of Fort Myers, Florida, decided to do a good deed for a stranger in a gas station convenience store, she had no idea that her most embarrassing moment would result in a viral story viewed by millions.

Keep Reading Show less
Culture

Despite controversial-but-compelling evidence that homework takes time away from families with little to no appreciable benefit for students, kids continue to slog through hours of school work outside the time they spend in the classroom. And despite evidence that small acts of kindness can infect a community like a positive virus, far too many kids are on either the giving or receiving end of unkind bullying on a regular basis.

Perhaps that's why an elementary school in Ireland has decided to do something radical—ditch all homework for the month of December and assign kids "acts of kindness" instead.

Keep Reading Show less
Education & Information
Courtesy of First Book

We take the ability to curl up with a good story for granted. Unfortunately, not everyone has access to books. For the 32 million American children growing up in low-income families, books are rare. In one low-income neighborhood in Washington, D.C., there is approximately one book for every 800 children. But children need books in their lives in order to do well in school and in life. Half of students from low-income backgrounds start first grade up to two years behind other students. If a child is a poor reader at the end of first grade, there's a 90% chance they're going to be a poor reader at the end of fourth grade.

In order to help close the literacy gap, First Book launched Give a Million, a Giving Tuesday campaign to put one million new, high-quality books in the hands of children. Since 1992, the nonprofit has distributed over 185 million books and educational resources, a value of more than $1.5 billion. Many educators lack the basic educational necessities in their classrooms, and First Book helps provide these basic needs items.

Keep Reading Show less
popular
True
first-book

I was 10 when my uncle Doug took his own life. I remember my mom getting the phone call and watching her slump down the kitchen wall, hand over her mouth. I remember her having to tell my dad to come home from work so she could tell him that his beloved baby brother had hung himself.

Doug had lived with us for a while. He was kind, gentle, and funny. He was only 24 when he died.

My uncle was so young—too young—but not as young as some who end their lives. Youth suicide in the U.S. is on the rise, and the numbers—and ages—are staggering.

Keep Reading Show less
popular