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A Bunch Of Government Officials Were Told That Gay People Were Inappropriate, So What They Did Is...

The M5S party, a political party in Italy, staged a protest to extend anti-discrimination laws to the LGBT community. The way they brought attention to their cause spread much further than the walls of Parliament.

A Bunch Of Government Officials Were Told That Gay People Were Inappropriate, So What They Did Is...

Some context, for those who don't speak Italian: The person speaking during most of the video is named Silvia Giordano, a member of the Italian Chamber of Deputies. This protest is happening because, right now, same-sex couples living in Italy have no shared rights to property, social security and inheritance. They also can't get married. A rough translation of what Giordano is saying:

"Mr. President (of the House of Deputies), beyond the thousands of excuses and quibbles, we're talking here of matters of the heart, of feelings, of emotions. Because a kiss and a hug have not and will never hurt anyone. In fact, they are part of what contributes most to making us human. We want to make that clear. And so we're going to pull back the veil and to demonstrate that there is truly nothing to be afraid of. And we, Mr. President, are not afraid."


The deputies, members of the M5S party, then hold up signs protesting a political compromise that's restricting the rights of LGBT Italians — while the rest turn to their colleagues and demonstrate just how unscary a kiss is.

The best line, though, comes from the President of the Chamber at the end. He can be heard saying, "Onorevole Nuti, se ha finito di baciare il collega, faccia ritirare quei cartelli," which translates to:

"Honorable Mr. Nuti, if you've finished kissing your colleague, please take down those signs."

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.