Why this 'British Forrest Gump' decided to run across 2 continents.

Jamie Ramsey just finished his 10,500-mile journey.

Meet Jamie Ramsey, the "British Forrest Gump."

Photo by Chris Ratcliffe/Getty Images.


He's a guy who loves to run — so much so that he just jogged from Vancouver, Canada, to Buenos Aires, Argentina.

The journey? More than 10,500 miles (or 17,000 kilometers) by Ramsey's estimate.

On Sunday, Jan. 10, 2016, Ramsey ended his trek with a light run from London's Heathrow Airport (where he landed after his adventure) to Westminster, in the center of the English capital. Because, you know, what's another dozen miles after jogging across two continents?

He invited any supporters to join him on that last leg of the journey. And his fans didn't disappoint.

Photo by Chris Ratcliffe/Getty Images

Photo by Chris Ratcliffe/Getty Images

Photo by Chris Ratcliffe/Getty Images.

His beard seemed to attract a friendly admirer or two.

Photo by Chris Ratcliffe/Getty Images

Ramsey's mom appeared over-the-moon to have him home...

Photo by Chris Ratcliffe/Getty Images.

...and Ramsey? He looked thrilled to have his hands on some champagne.

Photo by Chris Ratcliffe/Getty Images.

In order to make the journey work, Ramsey — who averaged about 26 miles a day during his trek — pushed a kit on wheels with all his belongings while he jogged. And get this: It weighed roughly 88 pounds (40 kilograms).

Whoa is right.

Why did Ramsey decide to do all this? Well, for starters, he simply missed the great outdoors.

Basically, Ramsey realized he wasn't getting any younger. And — after working that 9-5 life for quite some time — he got a bad case of wanderlust (who can blame him?).

Speaking to The Guardian back in April 2015 — about 8 months after starting his journey in Vancouver — he called the journey a "ridiculous adventure," but said that running gives him a "special insight" into other countries and the world around him:

"A lot of people ask why I am undertaking such a ridiculous adventure and the answer is pretty simple. I have worked in an office for 12 years. It felt to me like the window of opportunity to go and explore the world on foot was closing. I love running, always have, and will do it as long as my body allows me. Running through countries gives you a special insight, one that I think you lose in a car or on a bus."

Beyond his insatiable desire to jog, Ramsey wanted to raise funds for a few charities near and dear to his heart.

Because if you're going to get a bunch of attention for running, why not share the spotlight with a cause (or three)?

Photo by Chris Ratcliffe/Getty Images

One of the nonprofits Ramsey supported is CALM — a charity in the U.K. aimed at curbing suicide in men. Through his fundraising page, he raised more than $2,100 (1,462 British pounds) for the organization.

He also raised funds for WaterAid, which helps underserved regions access safe drinking water and sanitation, as well as a third charity called Macmillan Cancer Care, which benefits those in the U.K. who've been affected by cancer.

"It has certainly been an experience, but one I have absolutely loved," Ramsey said of his travels, according to The Telegraph. "A sincere thank you to all those who have helped me succeed both during the expedition and back at home."

If you're in one of those quarter-life or midlife slumps (believe me, I get it), maybe you should take a note from Ramsey.

We don't have to run 10,500 miles to treat our wanderlust, though — focusing on something other than ourselves and penciling in a (small) adventure could do the trick.

Photo by Chris Ratcliffe/Getty Images.

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