The man who discovered Pluto is about to become the first person to visit it.

We have visited all the planets of solar system and found worlds orbiting distant stars. Now we're about to explore ... Pluto? If you find yourself asking, "So what?" you're not alone. But you might be surprised by the answer.

The Search Begins

In 1929, a young researcher named Clyde Tombaugh was handed a thankless, seemingly impossible task.

His bosses at the Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, Arizona, gave him a series of nearly identical pictures of the same part of the night sky taken a few days apart and asked him to search, with his naked eyes, for a speck of light that moved like a planet. These were not pretty photos, and they barely changed from day to day. So we can only imagine how daunting this assignment must have felt for the young Tombaugh. Yet he took it graciously and spent over a year comparing photographs, two by two, using only an antiquated mechanical device called a blink comparator, his bare eyes, and his knowledge of planetary movement.

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They Sent A Camera Millions Of Miles Into Space. It Just Took These 7 Photos.

See mankind's first images from the surface of a comet.

On November 12, 2014, for the first time in history, we landed on a comet. It took a long time – about 10 years – to get there.

The Approach

Just a few days before the landing, we got our first up-close glimpses of the alien rock, called 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko, from the European Space Agency's probe, Rosetta. Here's what it looks like from about six miles away:

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This Video Is Broken On Purpose. Wait Until You See Why.

I'm going to come out and say it: The Internet is the best. It's such an incredible, expressive medium that we've not only become used to but that we've actually adapted to. We've invented languages, modes of communication, currencies, and even whole economies that exist only online. That's so cool!Now a bunch of companies want to control that by deciding who can do what at various speeds online. It's not just an obvious money-grab from companies who already make billions from the web, it's a threat to the humanity that exists online. Fortunately, there's a fairly easy way to get rid of that threat once and for all, and it starts with you watching this video.

Real quick, take a look outside your window. Do you see lots of roads? How many of them have dedicated, protected bus lanes? What about bike lanes? Unless you live in a few select cities — like Bogota, Colombia; Cleveland, Ohio; or Guangzhou, China — you're probably just looking at a few boring, old, single-purpose roads. That may not seem like a big deal right now, but check out this talk, and then tell me you don't feel even a little uncomfortable about the way cars — and the money it takes to operate them — dominate most American cities. We can totally do better.

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