This teen came up with a wildly smart invention to help his grandpa cope with Alzheimer's.

Meet Kenneth Shinozuka.

All GIFs via NBC News and Google Science Fair.


He lives with his grandpa. They're really close.

Unfortunately, Kenneth's beloved grandpa suffers from Alzheimer's disease.

Within a few years of being diagnosed, his grandfather started getting up in the middle of the night and wandering off — once even onto the freeway. He and his family were woken up when a police officer brought him back (safe, thankfully!).

"It was very real and very scary," Kenneth said in an NBC interview.

Kenneth wanted to find a way to keep his grandpa safe. So he invented something awesome.

...a simple sensor that attaches to a sock and alerts a caregiver's smartphone if the wearer wanders out of bed.

Kenneth's invention is so good, it won him a Science in Action award from Scientific American.

The sensors are now being tested by patients in a nursing home, with some impressive results.

This isn't just a win for Kenneth and his grandpa. Over 5 million Americans have Alzheimer's.

Roughly 60% of these folks will, at one time or another, wander off.

Kenneth's simple sock device can keep so many of our loved ones safe.

Not too shabby for a 15-year-old.

For full dose of heartwarming goodness, check out the video:

And here's a little more info on Kenneth's invention:

Heroes
Instagram / Frères Branchiaux Candle Co.

Three young Maryland brothers who started a candle company to buy new toys now donate $500 a month from their successful business to help the homeless.

Collin, 13, Ryan, 11, and Austin, 8, Gill founded "Frères Branchiaux," which is French for Gill Brothers, after their mom told them they could either get a job or start a business if they wanted more video games and Nerf guns.

"They surprised me when they started a business and they started selling at their baseball and football games and they've moved on to a vending truck," Celena Gill told Good Morning America.

The three of them have been making the candles in their Indian Head home for the last two years and business is booming, with 36 stores carrying the boys' products and a deal with Macy's in the works. They sell nearly 400 candles a month, priced from $18 to $36, along with other products like diffuser oils, room sprays, soap, bath bombs and salts, according to the Washington Post.


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