These fat old lesbians smoking weed are the only thing worth paying attention to on the Internet.

The internet is a truly wonderful place*. Aside from allowing us to order food and other perishable/non-perishable goods without speaking to anyone, it also allows us to connect with people we never thought possible. Like two old, fat lesbians who smoke weed all the time. Did you think you were going to find out about them today? Well, guess what: It's happening. It's happening RTFN.

View this post on Instagram

Sugar Babe


A post shared by The Likes of Dykes (@420oldfatlesbians) on

Sue and Lee are retired and reside in a house with an inflatable hot tub in Maine. I did not know they existed before, but an interview in The Cut brought them rip-roaring into my life, and now, like the interview's author, there is no one I would rather be when I grow up.

Sue and Lee, of course, never meant to be viral sensations. Together for 12 years and married for four, the pair just wanted something fun to do. So they started a social media project.

View this post on Instagram

Gravity Bong #thestaplesingers #illtakeyouthere

A post shared by The Likes of Dykes (@420oldfatlesbians) on

In their videos, they smoke weed in front of  a lovingly placed woodcut that appropriately reads "inspire" in their home; they smoke weed while they pour sugar all over a calendar (it makes sense if you know the song they're parodying); they smoke weed out of off-brand barbies. Recently, they filmed a video of themselves singing "Like a Virgin" while holding hands in bed. These videos are so silly, so unflinchingly and honestly cheesy, so mundane**.  

"We didn’t plan on being part of a movement. We just are fat, and old, and gay," Lee says in the couple's interview with The Cut.  That's also exactly what makes them so incredibly important.

View this post on Instagram

Mermaids and Flamingos Volume 2

A post shared by The Likes of Dykes (@420oldfatlesbians) on

Let me tell you a quick story: I knew I was gay really, really early in life. But I also knew that people thought being gay — even in San Francisco, where I live — was wrong. It's a message I got from everywhere — from the media, which primarily played homosexuality for shock value in the '90s, to my parents, who had bought into these negative stereotypes. They would bundle us all into the car when visitors came to town and take us down Castro street where we could gawk at the homosexuals openly holding hands.

It was especially sad for me. I'd sit in the back of that car and hope that maybe this whole "gay thing" was just a phase. And when it wasn't, I worried about being one of those old gay dudes in The Castro. I didn't have any role models to show me that you could be gay, old, and happy. Even though I eventually figured it out, I know that I would have loved to have a Sue and Lee to show me that life could be fucking awesome at all stages, body types, and sexual orientations.

"We’re hoping that people see us as just normal, everyday people. We’re trying to tell people not to hate gays, or fat people, or old people," Sue says in the interview.

You keep rocking on, ladies. Let's spread their message far and wide.

*It is also dark and full of terrors, but we are not speaking about that today.

**Take note, Met Gala attendees: This is what camp is!

More
via Twitter / Soraya

There is a strange right-wing logic that suggests when minorities fight for equal rights it's somehow a threat to the rights already held by those in the majority or who hold power.

Like when the Black Lives Matter movement started, many on the right claimed that fighting for black people to be treated equally somehow meant that other people's lives were not as valuable, leading to the short-lived All Lives Matter movement.

This same "oppressed majority" logic is behind the new Straight Pride movement which made headlines in August after its march through the streets of Boston.

Keep Reading Show less
Inclusivity

For most of us, the hypothetical question of whether we would stick with a boyfriend or girlfriend through the trials of cancer and the treatments is just that – a hypothetical question. We would like to think we would do the right thing, but when Max Allegretti got the chance to put his money where mouth is, he didn't hesitate for a second.

Keep Reading Show less
popular
via bfmamatalk / facebook

Where did we go wrong as a society to make women feel uncomfortable about breastfeeding in public?

No one should feel they have the right to tell a woman when, where, and how she can breastfeed. The stigma should be placed on those who have the nerve to tell a woman feeding her child to "Cover up" or to ask "Where's your modesty?"

Breasts were made to feed babies. Yes, they also have a sexual function but anyone who has the maturity of a sixth grader knows the difference between a sexual act and feeding a child.

Keep Reading Show less
popular
Instagram / JLo

The Me Too movement has shed light on just how many actresses have been placed in positions that make them feel uncomfortable. Abuse of power has been all too commonplace. Some actresses have been coerced into doing something that made them uncomfortable because they felt they couldn't say no to the director. And it's not always as flagrant as Louis C.K. masturbating in front of an up-and-coming comedian, or Harvey Weinstein forcing himself on actresses in hotel rooms.

But it's important to remember that you can always firmly put your foot down and say no. While speaking at The Hollywood Reporter's annual Actress Roundtable, Jennifer Lopez opened up about her experiences with a director who behaved inappropriately. Laura Dern, Awkwafina, Scarlett Johansson, Lupita Nyong'o, and Renee Zellweger were also at the roundtable.

Keep Reading Show less
popular