These eerie sounds collected from the universe are a Halloween delight.

Werewolf cries in the night may be scary here on Earth, but the sound of howling planets (!) shrieking into the black abyss of space? Now that'll make your skin crawl.

Just in time for Halloween, NASA has compiled a handful of spooky sounds it's discovered on its many missions through outer space. The terrifying tunes, collected in a 22-track SoundCloud playlist, are (literally) out of this world.

An image of Saturn taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft in 2002. Photo by NASA/Getty Images.


While you wouldn't technically hear these sounds floating through the solar system all on your own — remember, in space, no one can hear you scream — NASA created the playlist by converting radio emissions from its voyages into sound waves.

"The results are eerie to hear," according to the agency. And they're definitely not wrong.

These ghostly rumbles coming from Saturn are straight-up nightmare fuel, to be honest.

These unnerving soundbites were picked up while NASA's Cassini spacecraft orbited the planet and its ominous rings. Cassini launched in 1997 and, having just completed its final mission, took a farewell dive into Saturn's atmosphere on Sept. 15, 2017, never to be seen or heard from again.  

FYI, the spooky static noises emitted from Jupiter's largest moon, Ganymede, sound like a flock of ghost birds trying to communicate through a TV screen.

Jupiter is one spooktacular place, people (and ghosts and goblins). NASA's Juno spacecraft, tasked with observing the massive fifth planet from our sun, has discovered other sinister sounds while venturing around its orbit too; among them, the bone-chilling audio illustrating Jupiter's supersonic solar wind heating and slowing by the planet's magnetosphere: the "roar of Jupiter."

No joke, these menacing, high-pitched thuds picked up by Kepler could be the soundtrack to a new Michael Myers film.

You know, for the moment right before he starts stabbing.

The Kepler mission explores other solar systems in our neck of the Milky Way galaxy in hopes of spotting other Earth-like planets resting in their star's habitable zones (where liquid water could exist). After all, there's a really good chance we're not alone out there.  (*shivers run down spine*)

The entire Halloween playlist is worth a listen.

It might be useful too. Need a last-minute soundtrack to play on repeat in your community's haunted house? Or maybe just some eerie tunes to welcome the trick-or-treaters to your front porch? Either way, NASA has reminded listeners that while, yes, science is fascinating, important, and useful, it can also be downright spooky too.

Most Shared