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These eerie sounds collected from the universe are a Halloween delight.

Werewolf cries in the night may be scary here on Earth, but the sound of howling planets (!) shrieking into the black abyss of space? Now that'll make your skin crawl.

These eerie sounds collected from the universe are a Halloween delight.

Just in time for Halloween, NASA has compiled a handful of spooky sounds it's discovered on its many missions through outer space. The terrifying tunes, collected in a 22-track SoundCloud playlist, are (literally) out of this world.

An image of Saturn taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft in 2002. Photo by NASA/Getty Images.


While you wouldn't technically hear these sounds floating through the solar system all on your own — remember, in space, no one can hear you scream — NASA created the playlist by converting radio emissions from its voyages into sound waves.

"The results are eerie to hear," according to the agency. And they're definitely not wrong.

These ghostly rumbles coming from Saturn are straight-up nightmare fuel, to be honest.

These unnerving soundbites were picked up while NASA's Cassini spacecraft orbited the planet and its ominous rings. Cassini launched in 1997 and, having just completed its final mission, took a farewell dive into Saturn's atmosphere on Sept. 15, 2017, never to be seen or heard from again.  

FYI, the spooky static noises emitted from Jupiter's largest moon, Ganymede, sound like a flock of ghost birds trying to communicate through a TV screen.

Jupiter is one spooktacular place, people (and ghosts and goblins). NASA's Juno spacecraft, tasked with observing the massive fifth planet from our sun, has discovered other sinister sounds while venturing around its orbit too; among them, the bone-chilling audio illustrating Jupiter's supersonic solar wind heating and slowing by the planet's magnetosphere: the "roar of Jupiter."

No joke, these menacing, high-pitched thuds picked up by Kepler could be the soundtrack to a new Michael Myers film.

You know, for the moment right before he starts stabbing.

The Kepler mission explores other solar systems in our neck of the Milky Way galaxy in hopes of spotting other Earth-like planets resting in their star's habitable zones (where liquid water could exist). After all, there's a really good chance we're not alone out there.  (*shivers run down spine*)

The entire Halloween playlist is worth a listen.

It might be useful too. Need a last-minute soundtrack to play on repeat in your community's haunted house? Or maybe just some eerie tunes to welcome the trick-or-treaters to your front porch? Either way, NASA has reminded listeners that while, yes, science is fascinating, important, and useful, it can also be downright spooky too.

Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
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Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

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We know that mammals feed their young with milk from their own bodies, and we know that whales are mammals. But the logistics of how some whales make breastfeeding happen has been a bit of a mystery for scientists. Such has been the case with sperm whales.

Sperm whales are uniquely shaped, with humongous, block-shaped heads that house the largest brains in the animal world. Like other cetaceans, sperm whale babies rely on their mother's milk for sustenance in their first year or two. And also like other cetaceans, a sperm whale mama's nipple is inverted—it doesn't stick out from her body like many mammals, but rather is hidden inside a mammary slit.

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Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
True

Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

Keep Reading Show less