The 1 Extremely Sexist Decision That A Lot Of Bosses Don't Realize They're Making

Whether or not bosses are aware they're doing it, there's still a pretty sizable gender pay gap.

On average in the U.S., women are paid 77-78 cents for every dollar that an equally qualified dude makes. That's 22-23% less, a figure that hasn't really changed in the past decade.


Ugh. Come. On.

The U.S. doesn't officially track the pay gap through a government agency like other nations, including the Aussies who made the video below, but the inequality is essentially the same.

So, how does the gender pay gap really break down?

There are basically three types: the national gender pay gap, pay gaps within industries, and gaps within organizations.

The national gender pay gap is the difference between women's and men's average full-time salaries. (In the U.S., that's where the figure of women earning 22-23% less than men comes in.)

That figure breaks down into different industry categories. No matter if you're a chef or an educator, most industries — even the female-dominated ones — have a pay gap that favors men.

Within organizations, pay gaps trickle down into three categories: like-for-like, bi-level, and organization-wide.

Like-for-like is the pay gap that exists between men and women with the same job title. Bi-level gaps are measured between men and women at the same organizational level, such as managers. Organization-wide is the average difference in pay between men and women throughout the entire company.

The tricky part of this whole puzzle is that solving the gender pay gap is not as simple as adjusting numbers. We've also got to adjust perception.

Family and societal influences often perpetuate stereotypes about the type of work women should and shouldn't do.

As a result, lots of industries that are female-dominated include occupations that pay less. (See the correlation there? I'm not pointing fingers, but that's not a mistake.) There's actually an official term for that. It's called "industrial and occupational segregation."

Gender bias also contributes to the gap, as does having fewer women in leadership roles. As a result, men are often given higher starting salaries, bonuses, and raises unrelated to performance, while women, working just as hard, are left out in the cold.

We've gotta kill all of that.

let's educate ourselves about what's really going on. Here's a video that explains it all:

To learn more about all these moving parts and how the gender pay gap may affect you, check out the WGEA.

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Davina Agudelo was born in Miami, Florida, but she grew up in Medellín, Colombia.

"I am so grateful for my upbringing in Colombia, surrounded by mountains and mango trees, and for my Colombian family," Agudelo says. "Colombia is the place where I learned what's truly essential in life." It's also where she found her passion for the arts.

While she was growing up, Colombia was going through a violent drug war, and Agudelo turned to literature, theater, singing, and creative writing as a refuge. "Journaling became a sacred practice, where I could leave on the page my dreams & longings as well as my joy and sadness," she says. "During those years, poetry came to me naturally. My grandfather was a poet and though I never met him, maybe there is a little bit of his love for poetry within me."

In 1998, when she left her home and everyone she loved and moved to California, the arts continued to be her solace and comfort. She got her bachelor's degree in theater arts before getting certified in journalism at UCLA. It was there she realized the need to create a media platform that highlighted the positive contributions of LatinX in the US.

"I know the power that storytelling and writing our own stories have and how creative writing can aid us in our own transformation."

In 2012, she started Alegría Magazine and it was a great success. Later, she refurbished a van into a mobile bookstore to celebrate Latin American and LatinX indie authors and poets, while also encouraging children's reading and writing in low-income communities across Southern California.

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This article originally appeared on 08.15.18.


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