The 1 Extremely Sexist Decision That A Lot Of Bosses Don't Realize They're Making

Whether or not bosses are aware they're doing it, there's still a pretty sizable gender pay gap.

On average in the U.S., women are paid 77-78 cents for every dollar that an equally qualified dude makes. That's 22-23% less, a figure that hasn't really changed in the past decade.


Ugh. Come. On.

The U.S. doesn't officially track the pay gap through a government agency like other nations, including the Aussies who made the video below, but the inequality is essentially the same.

So, how does the gender pay gap really break down?

There are basically three types: the national gender pay gap, pay gaps within industries, and gaps within organizations.

The national gender pay gap is the difference between women's and men's average full-time salaries. (In the U.S., that's where the figure of women earning 22-23% less than men comes in.)

That figure breaks down into different industry categories. No matter if you're a chef or an educator, most industries — even the female-dominated ones — have a pay gap that favors men.

Within organizations, pay gaps trickle down into three categories: like-for-like, bi-level, and organization-wide.

Like-for-like is the pay gap that exists between men and women with the same job title. Bi-level gaps are measured between men and women at the same organizational level, such as managers. Organization-wide is the average difference in pay between men and women throughout the entire company.

The tricky part of this whole puzzle is that solving the gender pay gap is not as simple as adjusting numbers. We've also got to adjust perception.

Family and societal influences often perpetuate stereotypes about the type of work women should and shouldn't do.

As a result, lots of industries that are female-dominated include occupations that pay less. (See the correlation there? I'm not pointing fingers, but that's not a mistake.) There's actually an official term for that. It's called "industrial and occupational segregation."

Gender bias also contributes to the gap, as does having fewer women in leadership roles. As a result, men are often given higher starting salaries, bonuses, and raises unrelated to performance, while women, working just as hard, are left out in the cold.

We've gotta kill all of that.

let's educate ourselves about what's really going on. Here's a video that explains it all:

To learn more about all these moving parts and how the gender pay gap may affect you, check out the WGEA.

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When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."

Vanna White appeared on "The Price Is Right" in 1980.

Vanna White has been a household name in the United States for decades, which is kind of hilarious when you consider how she gained her fame and fortune. Since 1982, the former model and actress has made millions walking back and forth turning letters (and later simply touching them—yay technology) on the game show "Wheel of Fortune."

That's it. Walking back and forth in a pretty evening gown, flipping letters and clapping for contestants. More on that job in a minute…

As a member of Gen X, television game shows like "Wheel of Fortune" and "The Price is Right" send me straight back to my childhood. Watching this clip from 1980 of Vanna White competing on "The Price is Right" two years before she started turning letters on "Wheel of Fortune" is like stepping into a time machine. Bob Barker's voice, the theme music, the sound effects—I swear I'm home from school sick, lying on the ugly flowered couch with my mom checking my forehead and bringing me Tang.

This video has it all: the early '80s hairstyles, a fresh-faced Vanna White and Bob Barker's casual sexism that would never in a million years fly today.

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