In February, he played in the Super Bowl. In April, he joined the front lines to fight COVID-19
via Laurent Duvernay-Tardif / Instagram

To say that Kansas City Chiefs offensive guard Laurent Duvernay-Tardif has a wide range of talents would be an understatement. Drafted by the Chiefs in 2014, he's been a starting offensive lineman for most of his NFL career with one of the league's most consistently competitive teams.

In May 2018, he graduated from McGill University Faculty of Medicine in Montreal, Canada with a Doctor of Medicine and Master of Surgery. After receiving his degree, he formally asked the league to add the title "M.D." to the back of his jersey, but the league refused.

On February 2, 2020, the Chiefs bested the San Francisco 49ers in the Super Bowl, giving Kansas City its second Vince Lombardi trophy.


As the COVID-19 virus began to hit Canada, the 29-year-old doctor knew he had to help. "I have friends who are working in emergency rooms," he wrote in Sports Illustrated. "One does triage and tests patients for COVID-19. Those people are on the front line, and they're giving everything to protect us."

Duvernay-Tardif wasn't sure if he could to join the fight against the virus because he didn't have a license to practice.

"A few days ago, health ministry officials started a campaign to recruit health care professionals, especially students in medicine and nursing," Duvernay-Tardif writes. "It's now possible for me to go back and help. I had already wanted to, but when it's real, it hits you, the gravity involved."

On April 24, after going through a crash course to learn how to protect himself and others from COVID-19, he put on his scrubs and got to work at a long-term care facility near his home outside of Montreal.

"It's wild to think that just 10 weeks earlier I played in the biggest game in sports," he wrote.

"Playing in the Super Bowl vs. heading back to the medical system during a pandemic is totally different. Back in February, I knew that 100 million-plus people were going to be watching, and I wanted to win," Duvernay-Tardif wrote.

"When you're going in to help it's more about your duty as a doctor and a citizen," he added. "It's not the time to be the hero and be impulsive. You've gotta do it the right way. You've gotta really take this seriously when it comes to washing your hands, not touching anything."

He's also putting his expertise to use to help the NFL's Players Association Task Force decide the best way to bring the sport back in the fall. But, as someone whose seen the dangers of COVID-19 first-hand, his properties are in the right place.

"It's too soon to say when sports might come back. Or what that might look like. What I can say is if we're not playing in September, knowing all the implications of what sport means for a nation and the money behind this huge industry, there are going to be bigger issues than not playing football," he wrote.

Who knows when the NFL will be back, but when Duvernay-Tardif puts his Chiefs jersey i=on his back it should definitely have "M.D." printed on the back.



via schmoyoho / YouTube

If there's anything Americans need right now, it's a good laugh. In these divided times, if there is anyone who can provide one, it's "Weird Al" Yankovic.

The good news is he's back with a video that's a rare foray into American politics. Yankovic has avoided the topic throughout his career, although he did some non-partisan lampooning of the 2016 presidential debates with "Bad Hombres, Nasty Women."

In 2015, he told the Washington Times that he stays away from "sensitive" issues like "political topics. "And I don't want to divide my fan base if I can help it," he said.

"The other reason I don't do a lot of political humor is it dates pretty poorly," Yankovic said. "Things that are topical in the political arena this week would be old news a month from now, so that's probably not the kind of thing I want to have as part of my catalog."

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True

$200 billion of COVID-19 recovery funding is being used to bail out fossil fuel companies. These mayors are combatting this and instead investing in green jobs and a just recovery.

Learn more on how cities are taking action: c40.org/divest-invest


Former CBS News anchor Dan Rather has become a beloved voice of reason, knowledge, and experience for many Americans on social media the past few years. At 88, Rather has seen more than most of us, and as a journalist, he's had a front row seat as modern history has played out. He combines that lifetime of experience and perspective with an eloquence that hearkens to a time when eloquence mattered, he called us to our common American ideals with his book "What Unites Us," and he comforts many of is with his repeated message to stay "steady" through the turmoil the U.S. has been experiencing.

All of that is to say, when Dan Rather sounds the alarm, you know we've reached a critical historical moment.

Yesterday, President Trump again refused to commit to a peaceful transfer of power after the election when directly asked if he would—yet another democratic norm being toppled. Afterward, Rather posted the following words of wisdom—and warning—to his nearly three million Facebook fans:


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via Katie Porter

Americans spend about $1,2000 a year on average for prescription drugs. That's more than anywhere else in the world. Private insurers and government programs pick up the bulk of the costs which we then pay through higher taxes and insurance premiums.

A major reason why Americans pay so much more than other countries is that the U.S government isn't allowed to negotiate drug prices with pharmaceutical companies.

To better understand the underlying reasons for these astronomical prices, the U.S. House of Representatives Oversight and Reform Committee held hearings on Wednesday with current and former executives of three major drug companies.

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