More

One-man change machine Bradley Cooper's gonna start sharing salary info with his female colleagues.

Bradley Cooper and Jennifer Lawrence are in a fight ... for equality!

One-man change machine Bradley Cooper's gonna start sharing salary info with his female colleagues.

Actor Jennifer Lawrence wasn't the only one shocked to hear about the salary discrepancy between the male and female stars of "American Hustle." Bradley Cooper was shocked, too. (And he was making all kinds of money from it!)

Cooper is not into women being paid less than they deserve.


Mmm. Equality. Image via Sarah Ackerman/Flickr.

He's so INTO equality that he said he will share his salary info with his female costars.

This all came about thanks to a hack that revealed the percentages made by each actor in the David O. Russel film he starred in with Lawrence. The men all made 9% of the proceeds of "American Hustle" while the women got 7%.

Both of them were nominated for Oscars in "American Hustle," by the way. Image via "Silver Linings Playbook."

Cooper even mentioned that the amount Amy Adams got paid compared to him was "almost embarrassing."

Respect? Respect. Image via "American Hustle."

The guy's legit mad about it. When asked about costar Adams making less than he did, he got real.

Fightin' words.

Image via "Silver Linings Playbook."

"Usually you don't talk about the financial stuff, you have people. But you know what? It's time to start doing that," he told Reuters.

Usually negotiations are handled in isolation and by finance people or agents. It's the way it's always been. But actors using their "financial people" has only resulted in the status quo: secrecy and a lack of honesty.

Cooper is ready to shake that status quo by taking the communications of the folks who usually make the salary deals for actors into his own hands.

Image by Chad J. McNeeley/U.S. Navy/Wikimedia Commons; quote from Reuters.

And by making his own individual decision to make a change — he's going to make a difference in how his female costars are able to negotiate.

Bradley sees his costars as equal, and even though these ladies surely know their value already (let's be honest here, everyone in this saga is making millions of dollars), he's stepping up to make sure they know their full market value. How great is that?!

It's a cool example of an individual putting aside individual benefits for the ultimate benefit of working alongside his fellow actors as true equals.

Equality. It's a beautiful dance. Image via "Silver Linings Playbook."

I love this quote from Vogue's Michelle Ruiz because it applies not just to Holllywood, but to everyone who cares about equality in pay and in life:

"When it comes to salary equity, it's time to stop being polite. We can be quiet, or we can be equals."


It's surprising. But it's also SO awesome and kind. Go Bradley. <3 Image via "Silver Linings Playbook."

It's a call to us all to step up. Would you?

Courtesy of Verizon
True

If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon

When the COVID-19 pandemic socially distanced the world and pushed off the 2020 Olympics, we knew the games weren't going to be the same. The fact that they're even happening this year is a miracle, but without spectators and the usual hustle and bustle surrounding the events, it definitely feels different.

But it's not just the games themselves that have changed. The coverage of the Olympics has changed as well, including the unexpected addition of un-expert, uncensored commentary from comedian Kevin Hart and rapper Snoop Dogg on NBC's Peacock.

In the topsy-turvy world we're currently living in, it's both a refreshing and hilarious addition to the Olympic lineup.

Just watch this clip of them narrating an equestrian event. (Language warning if you've got kiddos nearby. The first video is bleeped, but the others aren't.)

Keep Reading Show less