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One-man change machine Bradley Cooper's gonna start sharing salary info with his female colleagues.

Bradley Cooper and Jennifer Lawrence are in a fight ... for equality!

One-man change machine Bradley Cooper's gonna start sharing salary info with his female colleagues.

Actor Jennifer Lawrence wasn't the only one shocked to hear about the salary discrepancy between the male and female stars of "American Hustle." Bradley Cooper was shocked, too. (And he was making all kinds of money from it!)

Cooper is not into women being paid less than they deserve.


Mmm. Equality. Image via Sarah Ackerman/Flickr.

He's so INTO equality that he said he will share his salary info with his female costars.

This all came about thanks to a hack that revealed the percentages made by each actor in the David O. Russel film he starred in with Lawrence. The men all made 9% of the proceeds of "American Hustle" while the women got 7%.

Both of them were nominated for Oscars in "American Hustle," by the way. Image via "Silver Linings Playbook."

Cooper even mentioned that the amount Amy Adams got paid compared to him was "almost embarrassing."

Respect? Respect. Image via "American Hustle."

The guy's legit mad about it. When asked about costar Adams making less than he did, he got real.

Fightin' words.

Image via "Silver Linings Playbook."

"Usually you don't talk about the financial stuff, you have people. But you know what? It's time to start doing that," he told Reuters.

Usually negotiations are handled in isolation and by finance people or agents. It's the way it's always been. But actors using their "financial people" has only resulted in the status quo: secrecy and a lack of honesty.

Cooper is ready to shake that status quo by taking the communications of the folks who usually make the salary deals for actors into his own hands.

Image by Chad J. McNeeley/U.S. Navy/Wikimedia Commons; quote from Reuters.

And by making his own individual decision to make a change — he's going to make a difference in how his female costars are able to negotiate.

Bradley sees his costars as equal, and even though these ladies surely know their value already (let's be honest here, everyone in this saga is making millions of dollars), he's stepping up to make sure they know their full market value. How great is that?!

It's a cool example of an individual putting aside individual benefits for the ultimate benefit of working alongside his fellow actors as true equals.

Equality. It's a beautiful dance. Image via "Silver Linings Playbook."

I love this quote from Vogue's Michelle Ruiz because it applies not just to Holllywood, but to everyone who cares about equality in pay and in life:

"When it comes to salary equity, it's time to stop being polite. We can be quiet, or we can be equals."


It's surprising. But it's also SO awesome and kind. Go Bradley. <3 Image via "Silver Linings Playbook."

It's a call to us all to step up. Would you?

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.