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NBA star J.J. Barea took the team jet down to Puerto Rico on a humanitarian mission home.

In the wake of Hurricane Maria, he was looking for ways to help out.

Dallas Mavericks point guard  J.J. Barea recently asked his boss, Mark Cuban, for a huge favor. He needed to borrow the team plane.

Without hesitation, Cuban gave Barea the go ahead and with good reason: Barrea needed to get to Puerto Rico to help his family and bring supplies for others stranded on the hurricane-ravaged island.

Barea celebrates a basket during a 2015 game. Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images.


Carrying along 32 generators, 7 tons of water, 5 tons of food, and 1.5 tons of medical supplies, Barea set off for his home of Puerto Rico the morning of Sept. 26, 2017.

Surveying the damage from the air and on the ground, Barea was shocked by the level of devastation left by Hurricane Maria.

"It's like a bomb exploded," he told the CBS affiliate in Dallas with tears welled up in his eyes.

[rebelmouse-image 19529465 dam="1" original_size="450x253" caption="GIF from CBSDFW/YouTube." expand=1]GIF from CBSDFW/YouTube.

Originally, Barea and his wife, Viviana, set out to crowdfund assistance for people on the ground in Puerto Rico — something people who want to do can still donate to. However, when the opportunity to make the trip down there himself came up, he jumped at the chance. His mother and grandmother, both on the island when Maria hit, rode back in the plane with Barea as did some friends and even a few complete strangers in need.

He's planning on making another trip in the next few days to drop off more supplies and offer on-the-ground assistance of his own.

[rebelmouse-image 19529466 dam="1" original_size="750x355" caption="Barea lands in Puerto Rico. Photo via CBSDFW/YouTube." expand=1]Barea lands in Puerto Rico. Photo via CBSDFW/YouTube.

Puerto Ricans are our fellow Americans, and they need our help.

The majority of the island's 3.4 million residents were still without power as of Sept. 26, and many still don't even have access to clean drinking water. Our president doesn't seem entirely invested in getting them the help they need, and a number of bureaucratic hurdles — such as the Jones Act — exist that prevent those of us itching to help out from doing so.

Some, like Barea (via Cuban, of course) and Pitbull, have access to private planes they can use to help out during the crisis, but most of us don't. Thankfully, Melissa Locker over at Fast Company put together a quick list of things you, personally, can do and organizations you can support if you want to help those whose lives have been devastated by the storm.

[rebelmouse-image 19529467 dam="1" original_size="450x253" caption=""Puerto Rico, for me, is everything." GIF from CBSDFW/YouTube." expand=1]"Puerto Rico, for me, is everything." GIF from CBSDFW/YouTube.

Watch the Dallas-Fort Worth CBS news affiliate's report on Barea's trip below.

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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Small actions lead to big movements.

Acts of kindness—we know they’re important not only for others, but for ourselves. They can contribute to a more positive community and help us feel more connected, happier even. But in our incessantly busy and hectic lives, performing good deeds can feel like an unattainable goal. Or perhaps we equate generosity with monetary contribution, which can feel like an impossible task depending on a person’s financial situation.

Perhaps surprisingly, the main reason people don’t offer more acts of kindness is the fear of being misunderstood. That is, at least, according to The Kindness Test—an online questionnaire about being nice to others that more than 60,000 people from 144 countries completed. It does make sense—having your good intentions be viewed as an awkward source of discomfort is not exactly fun for either party.

However, the results of The Kindness Test also indicated those fears were perhaps unfounded. The most common words people used were "happy," "grateful," "loved," "relieved" and "pleased" to describe their feelings after receiving kindness. Less than 1% of people said they felt embarrassed, according to the BBC.


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She's enjoying the big benefits of some simple life hacks.

James Clear’s landmark book “Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones” has sold more than 9 million copies worldwide. The book is incredibly popular because it has a simple message that can help everyone. We can develop habits that increase our productivity and success by making small changes to our daily routines.

"It is so easy to overestimate the importance of one defining moment and underestimate the value of making small improvements on a daily basis,” James Clear writes. “It is only when looking back 2 or 5 or 10 years later that the value of good habits and the cost of bad ones becomes strikingly apparent.”

His work proves that we don’t need to move mountains to improve ourselves, just get 1% better every day.

Most of us are reluctant to change because breaking old habits and starting new ones can be hard. However, there are a lot of incredibly easy habits we can develop that can add up to monumental changes.

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