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Matthew Perry gets candid on the most important factor in fighting addiction.

The 'Friends' star updated the world on his own struggles as an addict.

Matthew Perry gets candid on the most important factor in fighting addiction.

The world will forever remember Chandler Bing as the sardonic friend who loved Monica Geller and biting sarcasm.

But if you ask Matthew Perry — the real-life person who brought Chandler into our living rooms — having created the iconic "Friends" character isn't the biggest accomplishment in his life nowadays:


"I've had a lot of ups and downs in my life and a lot of wonderful accolades. But the best thing about me is that if an alcoholic comes up to me and says, 'Will you help me stop drinking?' I will say, 'Yes. I know how to do that.'"


Photo by Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images.

Perry — who's been open about his struggles with painkiller abuse and alcoholism for years — discussed how fame can be a powerful force for good in the Aug. 28, 2015, issue of The Hollywood Reporter.

Being on a TV show that tens of millions of people were watching gave Perry a unique platform to help others, the actor explained.

And, judging from the facts, it's definitely a perspective worthy of our attention.

Painkiller abuse in the U.S. has surged in the past several years.

"The United States is in the midst of a prescription painkiller overdose epidemic," according to the CDC. While Americans aren't reporting any more pain, the number of prescription painkillers prescribed and sold in the U.S. has quadrupled since 1999.

The center reported in 2011 that increasing painkiller abuse was responsible for more American deaths than cocaine and heroin combined.

Photo by Darren McCollester/Getty Images.

Gil Kerlikowske, former director of National Drug Control Policy, spoke on its effects in 2011, claiming painkiller abuse “is a silent epidemic ... stealing thousands of lives and tearing apart communities and families across America."

That's why Perry has spoken out about his own demons loud and clear.

The actor explained to The Hollywood Report how selflessness can be key to getting sober.

In his interview, Perry praised Phoenix House, a rehab center based in Venice, California, for helping him get back on the right track.

The center was instrumental in his recovery, Perry acknowledged, but it's ultimately an addict's responsibility to reach sobriety: "They're not the finished product," he said of treatment facilities. "You have to follow it up with a lot of hard work afterwards."

Photo by Jason Kempin/Getty Images.

Perry noted it's better for someone struggling with addiction to think more about others and less about themselves.

“The most important thing [in battling addiction] is always to get outside of your head and help another person. When you're having a bad day, call somebody and ask them how they're doing, and actually pay attention and listen to the answer."

Photo courtesy of Justin Sather
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While most 10-year-olds are playing Minecraft, riding bikes, or watching YouTube videos, Justin Sather is intent on saving the planet. And it all started with a frog blanket when he was a baby.

"He carried it everywhere," Justin's mom tells us. "He had frog everything, even a frog-themed birthday party."

In kindergarten, Justin learned that frogs are an indicator species – animals, plants, or microorganisms used to monitor drastic changes in our environment. With nearly one-third of frog species on the verge of extinction due to pollution, pesticides, contaminated water, and habitat destruction, Justin realized that his little amphibian friends had something important to say.

"The frogs are telling us the planet needs our help," says Justin.

While it was his love of frogs that led him to understand how important the species are to our ecosystem, it wasn't until he read the children's book What Do You Do With An Idea by Kobi Yamada that Justin-the-activist was born.

Inspired by the book and with his mother's help, he set out on a mission to raise funds for frog habitats by selling toy frogs in his Los Angeles neighborhood. But it was his frog art which incorporated scientific facts that caught people's attention. Justin's message spread from neighbor to neighbor and through social media; so much so that he was able to raise $2,000 for the non-profit Save The Frogs.

And while many kids might have their 8th birthday party at a laser tag center or a waterslide park, Justin invited his friends to the Ballona wetlands ecological preserve to pick invasive weeds and discuss the harms of plastic pollution.

Justin's determination to save the frogs and help the planet got a massive boost when he met legendary conservationist Dr. Jane Goodall.

Photo courtesy of Justin Sather

At one of her Roots and Shoots youth initiative events, Dr. Goodall was so impressed with Justin's enthusiasm for helping frogs, she challenged the young activist to take it one step further and focus on plastic pollution as well. Justin accepted her challenge and soon after was featured in an issue of Bravery Magazine dedicated to Jane Goodall.

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Photo by Gaelle Marcel on Unsplash

As it turns out, underdog stories can have cats as the main character.

Purrington Cat Lounge, where "adoptable cats roam freely and await your visit" and patrons can pay a small entry fee for the chance to sip coffee alongside feline friends, boasted legendary adoption rates since its conception in January 2015.


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