Malala says what many of us are thinking when it comes to Trump and refugees.

In an interview with "CBS This Morning," Malala Yousafzai offered some words of advice for President Donald Trump.

The 19-year-old Pakistani activist was in New York City to be honored as the newest U.N. Messenger of Peace — the highest recognition given by the United Nations — on April 10, 2017. She's the youngest recipient to have earned the title.

Speaking to "CBS This Morning," Yousafzai encouraged Trump to visit a refugee camp to learn more about the people who've been affected by conflict in Syria.


Photo by Vegard Wivestad Grott/AFP/Getty Images.

Yousafzai, who gained global notoriety for surviving a gunshot wound to the head at the hands of the Taliban in 2012 for daring to go to school as a girl, has focused her efforts on broadening access to education for children, particularly in the developing world.

"Once you educate girls, you change the whole community, you change the whole society," Yousafzai said on stage at the U.N., CNN reported.

Yousafzai's visit to America — and message for Trump — comes amid growing despair for Syrian families grappling with tragedy.

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad used chemical weapons to attack a rebel-backed region of his own country on April 4, 2017. More than 80 people, many of them children, were killed in the gruesome assault, with hundreds more injured.

A Syrian child receives treatment after the chemical attack. Photo by Mohamed Al-Bakour/AFP/Getty Images.

In what some critics have blasted as nothing more than a theatrical show of power accomplishing nothing, Trump approved targeted air strikes against Assad's regime — with no long-term strategy in place.

While many politicians and talking heads jumped for joy at the show of force, many others pointed to the hypocrisy of Trump's broader stance on Syria: If the president is so disturbed by a chemical attack on innocent people, shouldn't he also be accepting those same victims as refugees in the U.S.?

It's a question that's not lost on Yousafzai.

"It's important that [Trump} understands that these people are in need," she explained in the interview with "CBS This Morning."

"And I have seen them — I have went to refugee camps — and I think he needs to go to these refugee camps."

Yousafzai, who opened a school for Syrian refugee girls in 2015, said in January she was "heartbroken" over Trump's proposed Muslim and refugee travel ban to the U.S.

A Syrian woman prepares tea near her family's tent at a refugee camp in Turkey in 2014. Photo by Gokhan Sahin/Getty Images.

Because of the magnitude of the refugee crisis, humanitarian groups have been struggling to provide enough resources to ensure such camps have food, water, and adequate shelter for the families in desperate need.

While the victims of the horrific chemical attack certainly need our support, Yousafzai reminded viewers at home — and Trump — that so do the millions of Syrian refugees who'd already lost everything before last week.  

"He needs to know what real life is like in a refugee camp," she reiterated.

Watch a clip from the interview below:

via Black Voters Matter / Twitter and Yukiko Matsuoka / Flickr

While major Georgia-based companies Coca-Cola and Delta fought back against the state's new voting rights law with strongly-worded opposition, Patagonia is putting its money where its mouth is and funding activists.

On Tuesday morning, the outdoor apparel maker announced it will donate $1 million to grassroots groups pushing for increased voter access in the state. Half of the money will go to the New Georgia Project, which works to register Georgians to vote.

The other half will go to Black Voters Matter Fund which works to increase power in marginalized, predominantly Black communities by fighting for voting rights.

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Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
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Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

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