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Lingerie line debuts a new athletic wear collection designed by a sexual abuse survivor.

‌Back in 2014, American Eagle’s lingerie line, Aerie, stopped retouching, airbrushing, and Photoshopping the models in its ads. The fashion line also quit hiring girls with supermodel bodies in favor of those with natural-looking figures.

While some saw the move as a risk, a year later it announced a 10% uptick in sales after the change in direction.

“The purpose of ‘Aerie Real’ is to communicate there is no need to retouch beauty, and to give young women of all shapes and sizes the chance to discover amazing styles that work best for them,” Aerie’s Chief Merchandising Officer, Jennifer Foyle, said in a statement. “We want to help empower young women to be confident in themselves and their bodies.”


Since, the brand has continued its commitment to inclusion by introducing a clothing line that embraces natural-looking men. It has also launched campaigns showcasing women with physical and mental disabilities, visible scars, and a multitude of chronic illnesses.

Now, Aerie is reimagining the idea of celebrity fashion collaborations by launching a line of active wear co-created by gymnast Alexandra “Aly” Raisman.

At the 2012 Olympics, Raisman won gold medals in the team and floor competitions, as well as the bronze medal on the balance beam, making her the most decorated American gymnast at the Games.

At the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, she won a gold medal in the team event as well as silver medals in the individual all-around and for floor exercise.

In 2017, Raisman bravely spoke out about USA gymnastics doctor Lassy Nassar admitting she was sexually abused by him. She also called for sweeping changes in leadership at USA Gymnastics in light of the scandal.

Nassar was later sentenced to 60 years in federal prison for child pornography charges and 40 to 175 years in Michigan state prison after pleading guilty to seven counts of sexual harassment to minors.

Aerie’s decision to partner with Raisman on the Aerie x Aly Raisman collection is powerful because the company is elevating a woman not just because of her athletic accomplishments, but her courage to speak out about sexual abuse.

The new clothing line features positive affirmations for women such as “Unapologetically Me” and “Unstoppable.” Fifteen percent of the proceeds from the collection will go to help fight child sexual abuse through Flip the Switch, Raisman’s nonprofit.

“Two summers ago, I met with @Aerie for the first time, and we instantly connected,” Raisman wrote on Instagram. “We’ve become family, and they continue to go above and beyond in supporting me. To be able to work with Aerie and launch the Aerie x Aly Raisman collection is a dream come true.”

This article originally appeared on 09.06.17


Being married is like being half of a two-headed monster. It's impossible to avoid regular disagreements when you're bound to another person for the rest of your life. Even the perfect marriage (if there was such a thing) would have its daily frustrations. Funnily enough, most fights aren't caused by big decisions but the simple, day-to-day questions, such as "What do you want for dinner?"; "Are we free Friday night?"; and "What movie do you want to see?"

Here are some hilarious tweets that just about every married couple will understand.

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Democracy

A man told me gun laws would create more 'soft targets.' He summed up the whole problem.

As far as I know, there are only two places in the world where people living their lives are referred to as 'soft targets.'

Photo by Taylor Wilcox on Unsplash

Only in America are kids in classrooms referred to as "soft targets."

On the Fourth of July, a gunman opened fire at a parade in quaint Highland Park, Illinois, killing at least six people, injuring dozens and traumatizing (once again) an entire nation.

My family member who was at the parade was able to flee to safety, but the trauma of what she experienced will linger. For the toddler with the blood-soaked sock, carried to safety by a stranger after being pulled from under his father's bullet-torn body, life will never be the same.

There's a phrase I keep seeing in debates over gun violence, one that I can't seem to shake from my mind. After the Uvalde school shooting, I shared my thoughts on why arming teachers is a bad idea, and a gentleman responded with this brief comment:

"Way to create more soft targets."

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Paul Rudd in 2016.

Passing around your yearbook to have it signed by friends, teachers and classmates is a fun rite of passage for kids in junior high and high school. But, according to KDVR, for Brody Ridder, a bullied sixth grader at The Academy of Charter Schools in Westminster, Colorado, it was just another day of putting up with rejection.

Poor Brody was only able to get four signatures in his yearbook, two from what appeared to be teachers and one from himself that said, “Hope you make some more friends."

Brody’s mom, Cassandra Ridder has been devastated by the bullying her son has faced over the past two years. "There [are] kids that have pushed him and called him names," she told The Washington Post. It has to be terrible to have your child be bullied and there is nothing you can do.

She posted about the incident on Facebook.

“My poor son. Doesn’t seem like it’s getting any better. 2 teachers and a total of 2 students wrote in his yearbook,” she posted on Facebook. “Despite Brody asking all kinds of kids to sign it. So Brody took it upon himself to write to himself. My heart is shattered. Teach your kids kindness.”

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